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think this medicine has been often useful, and that it rather relieves the feverish heats, and the great irritability, than the general debility.

• Much has been faid of late in praise of myrrh in pulmonary complaints, both in its fimple ftate, and when combined with fal martis, alcaline and neutral falts, &c. I have given it in every form, and fometimes with fuccefs. But in cafes where the pulmonary hectic is confirmed, I have not feen it produce any relief. In this fever, I believe tonics of all defcriptions will be found to increase the symptoms, as they do in all cafes of inflammation. As I contend that there is no fuch power in medicine as is understood by the terms balfamic and pectoral, in their ufual acceptation, I confider this gum, with its acceflaries, as acting by its tonic power upon the ftomach and firft paffages, and where fuch remedies are indicated, I have found it a valuable medicine. In great weakness and languor, where it is thought advisable to attempt relief in this way, I would recommend an infufion of the myrrh in fimple aqua calcis. The particles of the calx uniting with the fixed air in the gum, render the solution more perfect than any other menftruum I have tried. The tincture, when filtered, will fic light on the ftomach, and may be combined with any thing that is thought proper,'

The diet alfo is more carefully and exactly regulated than in the former edition; and, as it now ftands, is a more clear as well as a more accurate fyftem, than we have yet met with on the fubject: we are fatisfied, from much experience, that it is exceedingly well adapted to confumptions.

As that part of the former edition which was taken from Dr. Stark's manufcript, has been the occafion of fome converfation fince the publication of the Medical Communications, and as we have conveyed Dr. Reid's firft apology to the public, it becomes neceffary to give his reafons at full length for not quoting the manufcript more diftinctly: they appear to us very fatisfactory.

When I was preparing the first edition of this work for the prefs, not being well acquainted with book-making, I was at a lofs how to diftinguifh an extract, or rather abitract (not be ing either verbatim or in the arrangement of the original) taken from a MS. not known, nor, as I had been informed, intended to be known to the public. On confulting with a medical friend, we agreed that the name at the bottom of the page would fully point out whence it was taken. But though it did fo in general, and was noticed as fuch by the author of the Med. Journal for Dec. 1783, yet in ftrict propriety it should have been marked with commas as it now is. Thirteen years had elapfed from my firft feeing the MS. and in that time I had more than once heard it mentioned by the prefent editor, that as fome part of the MSS. had been loft, he understood the remainder was not to be published; it did not therefore occur to

me

bour might be mifapplied. By connecting the ftories of Maria and Mif Hampden fo intimately, the author has raised contending interefts, which weaken the influence of each, and the catastrophe of the former's hiftory is too near that of the latter. At the iummit too of Maria's distress, her friend is relieved by a fortunate ecclairciffement; fo that the mind hangs in doubt whether it should rejoice or grieve

Mifs B. will not mifinterpret these hints: they are dictated rather by a defire to improve, than to depreciate her talents. She, at prefent, foars beyond many writers of this clafs; and, with a little care, may follow the firft with no little fuccefs.

The Omen; or, Memoirs of Sir Henry Melville and Mifs Julia Eaftbrook. A Novel. Two Volumes. I 2mo. 6s. Lowndes.

Neither the defign nor the execution of this novel is very happy. Many improbabilities occur in both; and we are not recompenfed by the brilliancy of wit, juftness of remark, well drawn characters, or interefting fituations. But, while we have little to praife, we have nothing very particularly to condemn : a rafh promife draws down misfortunes on her who makes it; yet, as the conclufion is happy, we are apt to forget the punishment in the fubfequent reward, and do not perceive with fufficient force the folly and impropriety of the conduct.

Areoftatic Spy; or, Excurfions with an Air Balloon. To Vols. 12mo. 65. Symonds.

This little work is fuperior to many attempts of the fame kind. It contains fome amufing adventures, juft reflections, and well drawn characters: it is not even deficient in its philofophical obfervations, if we except a fanguine partiality for aerial machines, and too great expectations of their utility. We recognite, at times, fome living characters; and vice and folly are held up to the infamy which they deferve. We do not however find any thing fo grofsly perfonal, as to deferve reprehenfion.

MEDICA L.

An Efay on the Nature and Cure of the Pthifis Pulmonalis. Second Edition, enlarged. By, Thomas Reid, M. D. F. R. S. 8vo. 55. Cadell.

In the 16th page of our Fifty-fifth Volume we gave a pretty early and full account of the first edition of this work; and we have fince had more than one occafion to mention it. We shall now only remark, that it is greatly enlarged and much impreved; but the foundation is nearly the fame. Dr. Reid mentions our remarks on the emetic tartar, with a flattering compliment; but we have already, in the account of his first edition, allowed that the ipecacuanha is preferable for frequent ufe; and, fince that period, have almost exclufively employed it, except where it failed to act as an emetic. We fhall extract what he obferves relating to myrrh, which is now firft publifhed. We

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think this medicine has been often useful, and that it rather relieves the feverish heats, and the great irritability, than the general debility.

Much has been faid of late in praise of myrrh in pulmonary complaints, both in its fimple ftate, and when combined with fal martis, alcaline and neutral falts, &c. I have given it in every form, and fometimes with fuccefs. But in cafes where the pulmonary hectic is confirmed, I have not seen it produce any relief. In this fever, I believe tonics of all defcriptions will be found to increafe the fymptoms, as they do in all cafes of inflammation. As I contend that there is no fuch power in medicine as is understood by the terms balfamic and pectoral, in their ufual acceptation, I confider this gum, with its acceffaries, as acting by its tonic power upon the ftomach and firft paffages, and where fuch remedies are indicated, I have found it a valuable medicine. In great weakness and languor, where it is thought advisable to attempt relief in this way, I would recommend an infufion of the myrrh in fimple aqua calcis. The particles of the calx uniting with the fixed air in the gum, render the folution more perfect than any other menftruum I have tried. The tincture, when filtered, will fit. light on the ftomach, and may be combined with any thing that is thought proper.'

The diet alfo is more carefully and exactly regulated than in the former edition; and, as it now ftands, is a more clear as well as a more accurate fyftem, than we have yet met with on the fubject: we are fatisfied, from much experience, that it is exceedingly well adapted to confumptions.

As that part of the former edition which was taken from Dr. Stark's manufcript, has been the occafion of fome conver fation fince the publication of the Medical Communications, and as we have conveyed Dr. Reid's firft apology to the public, it becomes neceffary to give his reafons at full length for not quoting the manufcript more diftinctly: they appear to us very fatisfactory.

• When I was preparing the first edition of this work for the prefs, not being well acquainted with book-making, I was at a lofs how to diftinguifh an extract, or rather abitract (not be ing either verbatim or in the arrangement of the original) taken from a MS. not known, nor, as I had been informed, intended to be known to the public. On confulting with a medical friend, we agreed that the name at the bottom of the page would fully point out whence it was taken. But though it did fo in general, and was noticed as fuch by the author of the Med. Journal for Dec. 1783, yet in ftrict propriety it should have been marked with commas as it now is. Thirteen years had elapfed from my firft feeing the MS. and in that time I had more than once heard it mentioned by the prefent editor, that as fome part of the MSS. had been loft, he understood the remainder was not to be published; it did not therefore occur to

me

me as neceffary to confult any perfon on the fubject. Had I given a defcription of tubercles from my own notes of diffections, it would have fo nearly resembled this in the leading points, that I thought it more candid to make the extract. But the nature of my work required that what related to the subject fhould be compreffed, the language corrected, and fome difference made in the arrangement; though the fenfe will be found (in my opinion) carefully preferved, and nothing material omitted. In fo doing have I injured the memory of Dr. Stark? On the contrary, it has been the caufe of publishing part of his MSS. after lying fifteen years in the editor's hands, and but for this would probably never have feen the light; and confequently his work would have been deprived of that reputation it fo jultly merits.

This plain recital of facts is meant as an answer to what Dr. Car. Smyth has faid upon the fubject in his introduction to Dr. Stark's MSS. in the Med. Commen. and I muft rely upon the candour of the reader to believe, that if I have erred, it was not intentionally.'

To this edition is added an appendix on the ufe and effects of frequent vomits. It contains an hiftorical detail of the practice, feemingly executed with accuracy and attention.

The remarkable Effects of Fixed Air in Mortifications of the Extremi ties. To which is added, the Hipory of fome Worm-cafes. By John Harrifon, Surgeon. 8vo. IS. Baker and Galabin.

The effects of this remedy were experienced only by two patients, and these were far advanced in life; but the fermenting poultices were remarkably fuccefsiul. In the first too, the complaint feemed not to be merely local; though, when the fixed air was employed, the general difeafe was much diminished, if not entirely removed: in the laft, the mortification was more certainly local,

The Worm-cafes are only added to recommend a fecret remedy. This conduct is unworthy of a man who practifes a liberal profeffion; nor will the conduct of Dr. James affift him. He who fhrinks from a trial, is frequently confcious that he cannot fupport it with credit.

The Medical Family Inflructor. By C. Hall, M. D. 8vo. 2s. 6d.

Stockdale.

The greatest part of this work is compiled from the obfervations of Dr. Fothergill and Hunter. Some others of inferior note bave contributed their fhares; and the whole is intended as a family companion. As a compendium of this kind it is evidently defective, both in the number of difeafes defcribed, and the directions for relieving them. The errors are not very numerous, as the compiler has generally been guided by good authorities; but, when he advifes vinegar in inflammations of the tendons, to diffolve the terra alba,' or the bark in defes of a drachm, we fmile at his credulity, and wonder at the refolution of his patients.

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The principal object of our author was, he obferves, the hydrophobia; but he has added fo little to the remarks of Dr. Fothergill, that we cannot perceive any advantage likely to accrue from it to the public-or to himself.

An experimental Enquiry into the Nature and Qualities of the Cheltenham Water. By A. Fothergill, M. D. F. R. S. 8vo. 6d. Johnson.

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As the ingenious author does not offer his analysis to the public as complete, we fhall not mention fome defects in the chemical part of his work. Dr. Fothergill aims rather to examine this water as a physician; and enough is distinctly ascertained, to direct an intelligent practitioner.

From the preceding experiments, a gallon of the water (wine measure) appears to contain the fubfequent principles, and nearly in the following proportions, viz. Native Glauber falt combined with a por

tion of Epfom falt,

Sea falt

Iron combined with fixed air

Magnefia combined with fixed air

Calcarious earth or felenite

I OZ.

5 grains.

5

25

40

Fixed air combined with a portion of phlogisticated air,

24 ounce measures. To thefe may perhaps be added a fmall portion of hepatic gas.'

The principal doubt arifes on the fubject of Glauber's falt. There is great reafon to think, that the neutral falt is wholly of the earthy kind, with magnesia or calcareous earth for its bafis; for thefe minute points are not properly examined. If we suppose an alkali to be the bafis of fome part of the neutral, we muft, to account for the fuperior folubility of the falt, fuppofe alfo the acid to be phlogifticated. The laft opinion will gain additional force from fome other appearances; but, in whatever ftate the acid may be, the probability of the existence of an alkali is not great.

Dr. Fothergill next examines the medical ufe of the water, from all its different ingredients. This is a method which we shall not follow, because it is very doubtful. The chief effects are flightly laxative and diuretic from the falts, together with a flight ftimulus on the ftomach from the fixed air. The waters must be ferviceable in vifceral obftructions and cutaneous complaints: we should fuppofe them too laxative for confumptive cafes. The iron and the hepatic vapour can do very little fervice, or injury.

We wish for a more accurate analyfis of all the mineral waters of Great Britain, as much as Dr. Fothergill; but we should alfo wish, that this analysis fhould be more extenfive and clear, than those which we have lately received from fome English chemifts. Very confiderable additions have been made to the

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