The Works of Charles Sumner, Volume 4

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Lee and Shepard, 1871 - Slavery
 

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Page 155 - March 6, 1820,) which, being inconsistent with the principle of non-intervention by Congress with slavery in the States and Territories — as recognized by the legislation of 1850, commonly called the Compromise Measures — is hereby declared inoperative and void; it being the true intent and meaning of this act not to legislate slavery into any Territory or State, nor to exclude it therefrom, but to leave the people thereof perfectly free to form and regulate their domestic institutions in their...
Page 189 - Texas by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings or by the powers vested in the marshals by law...
Page 111 - The present convention shall be in force for the term of ten years from the date hereof ; and. further, until the end of twelve months after either of the high contracting parties shall have given notice to the other of its intention to terminate the same ; each of the high contracting parties reserving to itself the right of giving such notice to the other, at the end of the said term of ten years...
Page 94 - was among his first wishes to see some plan adopted by which slavery in his country might be abolished.
Page 251 - If the opinion of the Supreme Court covered the whole ground of this act, it ought not to control the co-ordinate authorities of this government. The Congress, the Executive, and the Court, must each for itself be guided by its own opinion of the constitution. Each public officer, who takes an oath to support the constitution, swears that he will support it as he understands it, and not as it is understood by others.
Page 238 - There was no extravagance of the ancient parliamentary debate which he did not repeat ; nor was there any possible deviation from truth which he did not make, — with so much of passion, I gladly add, as to save him from the suspicion of intentional aberration.
Page 189 - An act to provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the Union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions,' it is enacted, ' that whenever the laws of the United States shall be opposed, or the execution thereof obstructed, in any state, by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, or by the power vested in the marshals...
Page 143 - ... mean the harlot, Slavery. For her, his tongue is always profuse in words. Let her be impeached in character, or any proposition made to shut her out from the extension of her wantonness, and no extravagance of manner or hardihood of assertion is then too great for this Senator. The frenzy of Don Quixote in behalf of his wench Dulcinea del Toboso, is all surpassed.
Page 250 - This Senator was disturbed, when to his inquiry, personally, pointedly, and vehemently addressed to me, whether I would join in returning a fellow-man to slavery? I exclaimed, ' Is thy servant a dog, that he should do this thing...
Page 239 - State" — ay, sir, from South Carolina — he turns with lordly disgust from this newly-formed community, which he will not recognize even as a "body politic." Pray, sir, by what title does he indulge in this egotism? Has he read the history of "the State

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