The Writings of Charles Dickens, Volume 16

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1894
 

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Page xxvi - O, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost thence my nature is subdued To what it works in, like the dyer's hand. Pity me then and wish I were renew'd...
Page 260 - Enter not into judgment with thy servant, O LORD; for in thy sight shall no man living be justified.
Page 20 - So when they continued asking him, he lifted up himself, and said unto them, He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her.
Page 20 - Watch ye therefore: for ye know not when the master of the house cometh, at even, or at midnight, or at the cockcrowing, or in the morning : lest coming suddenly he find you sleeping. And what I say unto you I say unto all, Watch.
Page 230 - To be hustled, and jostled, and moved on ; and really to feel that it would appear to be perfectly true that I have no business, here, or there, or anywhere ; and yet to be perplexed by the consideration that I am here somehow, too, and everybody overlooked me until I became the creature that I am...
Page 1 - Fog everywhere. Fog up the river, where it flows among green aits and meadows; fog down the river, where it rolls defiled among the tiers of shipping, and the waterside pollutions of a great (and dirty) city.
Page 229 - Now, these tumbling tenements contain, by night, a swarm of misery. As, on the ruined human wretch, vermin parasites appear, so, these ruined shelters have bred a crowd of foul existence that crawls in and out of gaps in walls and boards ; and coils itself to sleep, in maggot numbers, where the rain drips in...
Page 229 - Jo lives — :that is to say, Jo has not yet died — in a ruinous place, known to the like of him by the name of Tom-allAlone's. It is a black, dilapidated street, avoided by all decent people; where the crazy houses were seized upon, when their decay was far advanced, by some bold vagrants, who, after establishing their own possession, took to letting them out in lodgings. Now, these tumbling tenements contain...
Page 121 - ... corpulent but for his being so continually in earnest that he gave it no rest, and a chin that might have subsided into a double chin but for the vehement emphasis in which it was constantly required to assist; but he was such a true gentleman in his manner, so chivalrously polite, his face was lighted by a smile of so much sweetness and tenderness, and it seemed so plain that he had nothing to hide, but showed himself exactly as he was...
Page 228 - What connexion can there be, between the place in Lincolnshire, the house in town, the Mercury in powder, and the whereabout of Jo the outlaw with the broom, who had that distant ray of light upon him when he swept the...

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