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BOSTON:
CROSBY, NICHOLS, LEE, AND COMPANY,

No. 117 WASHINGTON STREET.

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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1860, by

B. F. BAKER AND J. W. TUFTS,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.

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ELECTROTYPED AT THE
BOSTON STEREOTYPE FOUNDRY.

EDWARD L. BALCH, MUSIC TYPOGRAPII ER,

34 SCHOOL STREET.

Printed by Welch, Bigelow, & Co.

In the preparation of the “ Church Choral-Book," the editors have endeavored to furnish appropriate hymn tunes for congregational singing. We are aware of the doubts entertained by many with regard to this mode of worship, which are founded, probably, upon the difficulties attending the experiments as yet made. These, causing, in our opinion, a partial failure, are the want of practice, and especially the endeavor to sing in parts instead of uniting upon

the Melody. If any one should object to singing in unison from the fact that he has always sung a subordinate or accompanying part, let him consider that he has learned his part from a particular arrangement, while others have studied theirs from another and different harmony. During service, every singer will find himself inclined to trust his memory rather than to refer to the printed notes; and the variety of notes and parts arising from this cause must, necessarily, prevent the unity and devotional spirit essential in church worship. Furthermore, the Melody of a tune is what first impresses the mind; and should one desire to give to another an idea of a particular tune, he would not think of singing his Alto, Tenor, or Bass, as he learned it, but would at once sing the Melody.

The design in this book is that all should sing the Melody, which will be found at the top of the page, and so transposed as to be within the reach of every singer. The tunes here collected (with the exception of CORONATION and PALESTINE, which have been retained for the sake of old associations) are well adapted in every way for congregational use. Among them are many of the choicest specimens of English, German, and American psalmody. Several chorals and hymn tunes are presented never before published in this country, to which we would invite attention. The highest authorities have been consulted, among which are the great and standard book of German Chorals by Saemann, and the collections by Novello, Ions, Clark, and others.

This work will be found useful for Choirs and Vestry meetings, the organ part being a complete vocal score.

For a simple accompaniment, we would advise the addition of a Pedal Bass to the organ part at the bottom of the page; and an example of a full organ score will be seen written for the tune GASTORIUS, pp. 196 and 197.

In giving out the tunes for congregational or other use, we would advise strict adherence to the following directions: Play the parts exactly as printed, without transposition, unless an elaborate accompaniment is afforded, which could only be done by advanced players. Give the exact time that the congregation shall take up. Strike distinctly every note of the Melody.

Too little attention has been bestowed upon the time of singing church tunes by the congregation. That the chorister or organist may have a guide to a correct movement, we would suggest as follows: For a class of tunes, as OLD HUNDRED and St. Pauls, with a proportionate addition or deduction as they may be longer or shorter, 40 to 45 seconds for each verse. For a second class, as STERLING and APPLETON, 30 to 35 seconds. For a third class, as TRURO and SUMMER STREET, 35 to 40 seconds. For a fourth class, as LUTON and ATLANTIC, 45 to 50 seconds. And for a fifth class, as MOZART, 20 to 25 seconds.

In their willingness to contribute to the pages of this work, the publishers of the “Congregational Hymn Book," the “Psalmist,” the “Hymns for the Church of Christ," and the “Greenwood's Collection of Hymns,” have manifested a cordial generosity for which the Editors are truly grateful.

That the melodies and harmonies of the “ Church Choral-Book” may prove acceptable to every true lover of music, and that thereby the service of the church may be improved, is the sincere wish of the

EDITORS.

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Eternal are thy mercies, Lord;

The saints shall flourish in his days, Eternal truth attends thy word ;

Dressed in the robes of joy and praise ; Thy praise shall sound from shore to shore, Peace, like a river, from his throne Till suns shall rise and set no more. Shall flow to nations yet unknown.

ORGAN.

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Praise him

bove, ye heaven - ly host; Praise Fa - ther, Son, and Ho - ly Ghost.

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5 THROUGH every age, eternal God, ETERNAL and immortal King, Thou art our rest, our safe abode: Thy peerless splendors none can bear; High was thy throne ere heaven was made, But darkness veils seraphic eyes, Or earth, thy humble footstool, laid. When God with all his glory's there. Long hadst thou reigned ere time began, Yet faith can pierce the awful gloom ; Or dust was fashioned into man;

The great Invisible can see; And long thy kingdom shall endure, And with its tremblings mingle joy, When earth and time shall be no more. In fixed regards, great God, on thee.

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