Debate at the Lane Seminary, Cincinnati: Speech of James A. Thome, of Kentucky, Delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Anti-Slavery Society, May 6, 1834 ; Letter of the Rev. Dr. Samuel H. Cox, Against the American Colonization Society

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Page 8 - I have been in the deep ; in journeyings often, in perils of waters, in perils of robbers, in perils by mine own countrymen, in perils by the heathen, in perils in the city, in perils in the wilderness, in perils in the sea, in perils among false brethren ; in weariness and painfulness, in watchings often, in hunger and thirst, in fastings often, in cold and nakedness.
Page 15 - In this was manifested the love of God toward us, because that God sent his only begotten Son into the world, that we might live through him. Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.
Page 16 - I have surely seen the affliction of my people, which are in Egypt, and have heard their cry by reason of thei1 taskmasters; for I know their sorrows; and I am come down to deliver them...
Page 16 - ... deliver them out of the hand of the Egyptians, and to bring them up out of that land unto a good land and a large, unto a land flowing with milk and honey...
Page 15 - Son into the world, that we might live through Him. Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that He loved us, and sent His Son to be the propitiation for our sins. Beloved, if God so loved us we ought also to love one another.
Page 13 - We are NATIVES of this country, we ask only to be treated as well as FOREIGNERS. Not a few of our fathers suffered and bled to purchase its independence; we ask only to be treated as well as those who fought against it. We have toiled to cultivate it, and to raise it to its present prosperous condition; we ask only to share equal privileges with those who come from distant lands, to enjoy the fruits of our labour.
Page 9 - They only show that whatever is to be feared from the abolition of slavery, horrors, a hundred fold greater, cluster about its existence. Heap them up, all hideous as they are, and crowd them home ; they will prove an effectual medicine. Let me be understood here. This pollution is the offspring of slavery : it springs not from the character of the negro, but from the condition of the slave.
Page 13 - ... hath made of one blood all nations of men to dwell on all the face of the earth...
Page 13 - By the scandalous misrepresentations, which they are continually giving of our character and conduct, we have sustained much injury, and have reason to apprehend much more. ' Without any charge of crime, we have been denied all access to places, to which we formerly had the most free intercourse ; the colored citizens of other places, on leaving their homes, have been denied the privilege of returning ; and others have been absolutely driven out. ' Has the Colonization Society had no effect in producing...
Page 13 - ... fought against it. We have toiled to cultivate it, and to raise it to its present prosperous condition; we ask only to share equal privileges with those who come from distant lands, to enjoy the fruits of our labour. Let these moderate requests be granted, and we need not go to Africa nor anywhere else to be improved and happy. We cannot but doubt the purity of the motives of those persons who deny us these requests, and would send us to Africa to gain what they might give us at home.

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