Cloning After Dolly: Who's Still Afraid?

Front Cover
Rowman & Littlefield, 2004 - Medical - 211 pages
As the #1 topic in bioethics, cloning has made big news since Dolly's announced birth in 1998. In a new book building on his classic Who's Afraid of Human Cloning?, pioneering bioethicist Gregory E. Pence continues to advocate a reasoned view of cloning. Beginning with his surreal experiences as an expert witness before Congressional and California legislative committees, Pence analyzes the astounding recent progress in animal cloning; the coming surprises about human cloning; the links between animal, stem cell, and human cloning; embryo politics; and other hot topics like artificial wombs and transgenic animals. Pence rebuts the growing chorus of naysayers headed by Leon Kass, chairman of the President's Council on Bioethics, who attack the biomedical sciences, and explains why cloning will save endangered species and beloved pets, and help future children and people with degenerative diseases.
 

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Contents

How Cloning Will Surprise Us
1
What Cloning Tells Us about Ourselves
10
The Brave New World of Animal Cloning Racing Mules and Million Dollar Cows
16
Cloning Endangered Species and Pets
30
Psst Rael Wants to Sell You the Brooklyn Bridge
38
Does Cloning Harm the Souls of Cloned Children?
44
Deciphering Cloning at the Earliest Stages of Life
52
Does One Kind of Cloning Beget Another?
69
Risking My Baby
116
Should Cloned Children Be Outlaws?
122
Prelude to Cloning The Ethics of OutofBody Gestation
133
Humanzees Transhumans and Transgenic Animals
144
Three Challenges to Cloning Great People
162
Gathering Darkness or Transhumanist Light?
175
Notes
183
Index
201

Why Cloning Will Not Affect Genetic Diversity
82
Marxists Feminists and Actors on Cloning
90
Is Safe Reproductive Cloning Good?
100
About the Author
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Gregory E. Pence is a medical ethicist with nearly thirty years of experience teaching and writing in bioethics. He is professor in the School of Medicine and the Department of Philosophy at the University of Alabama-Birmingham. Among his many books for general audiences are Brave New Bioethics (2002), Designer Food (2001), Recreating Medicine (2000), and Who's Afraid of Human Cloning? (1998). He has also published two best-selling textbooks, Classic Cases in Medical Ethics and Classic Works in Medical Ethics, both in numerous editions.

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