Transactions of the Linnean Society, Volume 13

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Vols. 5-21 include section: "Catalogue of the Library of the Linnean Society."

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Page 228 - ... of such a parasite is, perhaps, the Dodder, one kind of which infests cultivated flax, while others are found on clover, heath, and whin. The gigantic Rafflesia belongs to this class. Without a vestige of foliage, it rises at once from the long slender stems of one of the wild vines of Sumatra — immense climbers, which are attached like cables to the largest trees in the forest. The buds push through the bark like little buttons, continuing to grow until they have the aspect of large closed...
Page 203 - The whole flower was of a very thick substance, the petals and nectary being in but few places less than a quarter of an inch thick, and in some places three quarters of an inch ; the substance of it was very succulent. When I first saw it a swarm of flies were hovering over the mouth of the nectary, and apparently laying their eggs in the substance of it.
Page 263 - ... protrude from the mouth, curving downwards and backwards with an elegant sweep. In one variety, an animal called by Cuvier the Kanchil, proverbial both for its swiftness and cunningness, it is said, " that when closely pursued by dogs the creature will sometimes make a bound upwards, hook itself on a branch of a tree by means of its crooked tusks, and there remain suspended till the dogs have passed beneath...
Page 255 - ... admitted to my table, as was frequently the case, gave a proof of his taste, by refusing to eat any fruit but mangosteens, or to drink any wine but champagne. The only time I knew him to be out of humour was on an occasion when no champagne was forthcoming.
Page 202 - I immediately went with the man about a hundred yards in the jungle, and he pointed to a flower growing close to the ground under the bushes, which was truly astonishing. My first impulse was to cut it up and carry it to the hut. I therefore...
Page 203 - ... more), I soon detached it and removed it to our hut. To tell you the truth, had I been alone, and had there been no witnesses, I should, I think, have been fearful of mentioning the dimensions of this flower, so much does it exceed every flower I have ever seen or heard off; but I had Sir Stamford and Lady Raffles with me, and a Mr.
Page 203 - L over the mouth of the nectary, and apparently laying their eggs in the substance of it ; it had precisely the smell of tainted beef. Now for the dimensions, which are the most astonishing part of the flower. It measured a full yard across ; the petals, which were sub-rotund, being...
Page 229 - Kr&bul seems to take its origin in some crack or hollow of the stem, and soon shows itself in the form of a round knob, which, when cut through, exhibits the infant flower enveloped in numerous...
Page 203 - ... of an inch ; the substance of it was very succulent. When I first saw it, a swarm of flies were hovering over the mouth of the nectary, and apparently laying their eggs in the substance of it ; it had precisely the smell of tainted beef.
Page 204 - Raffles, and myself, taking immediate measures to be accurate in this respect, by pinning four large sheets of paper together, and cutting them to the precise size of the flower. The nectarium, in the opinion of all of us, would hold twelve pints, and the weight of this prodigy we calculated to be fifteen pounds. " ' I have said nothing about the stamina ; in fact, I am not certain of the part I ought to call stamina. If the moniliform cord surrounding the base of the pistil were sessile anthers,...

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