The British Poets: Including Translations ...

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Page 30 - A lovely Ladie rode him faire beside, Upon a lowly Asse more white then snow, Yet she much whiter; but the same did hide Under a vele, that wimpled was full low...
Page 157 - Faery thee uuweeting reft, There as thou slepst in tender swadling band, And her base Elfin brood there for thee left : Such, men do chaungelings call, so chaung'd by Faeries theft.
Page 40 - With faire discourse the evening so they pas : For that olde man of pleasing wordes had store, And well could file his tongue as smooth as glas, He told of Saintes and Popes, and evermore He strowd an Ave-Mary after and before.
Page 33 - Yea but (quoth she) the perill of this place I better wot then you, though now too late To wish you backe returne with foule disgrace, Yet wisedome warnes, whilest foot is in the gate, To stay the steppe, ere forced to retrate. This is the wandring wood, this Errours den, A monster vile, whom God and man does hate : Therefore I read beware. Fly fly (quoth then The fearefull dwarfe) this is no place for living men.
Page 3 - The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline...
Page 29 - A GENTLE Knight was pricking on the plaine, Ycladd in mightie armes and silver shielde, Wherein old dints of deepe woundes did remaine, The cruell markes of many a bloody fielde ; Yet armes till that time did he never wield : His angry steede did chide his foming bitt, As much disdayning to the curbe to yield : Full jolly knight he seemd, and faire did sitt, As one for knightly giusts and fierce encounters fitt.
Page 42 - He, making speedy way through spersed ayre, And through the world of waters wide and deepe, To Morpheus house doth hastily repaire. Amid the bowels of the earth full steepe, And low, where dawning day doth never peepe, His dwelling is; there Tethys his wet bed Doth ever wash, and Cynthia still doth steepe In silver deaw his ever-drouping hed, Whiles sad Night over him her mantle black doth spred.
Page 35 - Now, now, Sir knight, shew what ye bee; Add faith unto your force, and be not faint; Strangle her, els she sure will strangle thee." That when he heard, in great perplexitie, His gall did grate for griefe and high disdaine; And, knitting all his force, got one hand free, Wherewith he grypt her gorge with so great paine, That soone to loose her wicked bands did her constraine.
Page xiii - Full little knowest thou, that hast not tried, What hell it is in suing long to bide: To lose good days, that might be better spent; To waste long nights in pensive discontent; To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow; To feed on hope, to pine with fear and sorrow; To have thy prince's grace, yet want her peers...
Page 4 - I labour to pourtraict in Arthure, before he was king, the image of a brave knight, perfected in the twelve private morall vertues, as Aristotle hath devised...

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