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this description made his appearance in all Erie. * The amount of it all is, that Erie is a first rate missionary point; that a noble society could be formed out of the dry bones now lying in the valley, exceeding many and dry, as soon as the Lord's true prophet shall stand over them and tell them to live. No other man can do any thing at all. If you can find him, equip him forthwith, give hinyour God speed, and let him come on.

CLEVELAND, OHIO. I arrived here night before last : and am now waiting for a boat to go to Toledo where I engaged to be next Sunday. * There are here some half dozen individuals, who have been brought up in the bosom of Unitarianism; who understand it, and love it; and who are strongly inclined to meet together for religious worship, whether they have a minister or not.;

I was glad to find, on my arrival here, that Mr. Hosmer bad preceded me, Dr. Kendall supplying for him. He preached here last Sunday, in an upper room, where the disciples assembled to the number of 50 or 60; and a great, very great interest is already awakened.

preached here twice on Sunday, and once last evening, (Monday); on Sunday, we had from 60 to 80 : last night the court-house was crowded full, say 200. The materials for the most part are of the right kind: our friends are full of zeal, and know well what they are about.

* They authorise me now to procure a preacher for them; and are ready to organise themselves in regalar form, as a liberal society. We have Episcopalians and Presbyterians at our services; and though, I am sure, no disguise has been used, nothing smoothed over, they say that they are surprised to find Unitarianism so much better than they expected; and in no case that I have heard of, has any offence been given. This is the most beautifal city I have seen west of Massachusetts. It looks not unlike Worcester and quite as pleasant. It is as healthy as New England, and the young man who can gather a society around him here, will find a “good. ly heritage."

My impressions are the same with those of others who have preceded me, as to the importance of this place, and the absolute necessity of supplying it with preaching. If I were merely to copy all that had been said to me on this, by the best citizens of the town, you might deem

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TOLEDO,

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it enthusiastic; but after all I have seen and heard of the interest in Unitarian preaching there and elsewhere, I really can hardly understand, why our most able young men do not almost without exception, fix their eyes upon some of these great central positions, and resolve to sink or swim with it, rather than to plod on with liltle apparent effect at home. I found on my arrival at Toledo a week ago yesterday, every thing prepared for my reception; the people anxious not to be without preaching for a single Sunday; and gratified for every expression of interest from their Eastern friends. preached in the morning, in the school-room, on the edge of the forest; in the afternoon in a hall of the courthouse on the river bank, about a mile from the former place; and in the evening, a third service at the schoolroom again. The audience was large in each case; that is, the rooms were as full as they could hold ; say from 80 to 100; very attentive; and excellent singing. A fine spirit prevails among the people ; and if Mr. Sears can be induced to return, the success of the society is certain. I hope Mr. Sears is aware of the love and admiration he has called forth ; if not, he ought to know of it; and unless there are the strongest reasons to the contrary, I see not how he can refuse to comply with the wishes of his friends.

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CHICAGO,

On Saturday, handbills were struck off and pasted up, a singing choir collected, a room procured, and every thing made ready. I preached this morning in the Municipal Court-room to about 80: a meeting is appointed for this evening, when they say, I shall have three or four times that number; and if any body doubts the existence of Unitarian zeal let him become acquainted with their brethren at Chicago:

They are in a state now to support a minister; they are regularly organized; they feel strong in themselves; and there are not a few, who belong at present to other societies, in. telligent and influential men too, who are only waiting for the appearance of a permanent minister, to take side with the Unitarians.

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DETROIT.

Every place was pre-occupied; not an inch of ground to hold forth from to be had for love or money. The University Hall where Mr. M. preached was closed up, on account of a vote of the Trustees never to let it for such para

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Unitarianism in the Far West.! 391 poses again; the Capitol was engaged to the Episcopalians; and the City Hall, a room which can hereafter be had, was to be occupied by a little society of Presbyterians, to whom Edward Beecher was to preach. We tried to get it for a part of the day, or the evening ; but without success. It was now too late to push on to Toledo, where I knew I should be welcome ; I could not retrace my steps to Chic So, where I should be no less so; and as worst had come to worst, there was nothing to do, but to bear an idle Sunday as well as I could. So to-day I am doing nothing, as you perceive, through circumstances wbich I could not anticipate or control.

Aug. 7.—I found, after writing you my last letter, that our friends there, were not disposed to let me off so easily as I thought; they were much excited by the refusal of a place for our services; many united with them in this feeling, who had taken little interest in the subject before; and at the urgent request of a number of respectable individuals, I concluded to remain a day or two, and preach a discourse on Tuesday night. The City Hall was obtained for this purpose a large room holding 800 persons; notices were given in all the morning papers that the subject of Unitarian theology would be discussed ; and when we assembled in the evening, we found a good audience, and including, as I was told, many of the

most intelligent men of the city. Meanwhile, I had made the acquaintance of several young men, who are deeply interested in our views, and who are resolved to form a liberal society; their appearance is very promising, and before I left, they requested me to make arrangements for a constant supply of preaching, pledging themselves to raise the necessary amount to meet the expenses.

A person however, must be truly liberal, in the best sense of the word, to do any thing here, he must preach from his own soul, and not from books; and he must have that strong faith which will impel him to speak right on, without fear of man. I repeat it, dont try any experiments on these good Western folks ; if a young man wants to air his vocabulary, let him not come here; and unless he feels that he has a special errand to them, that he has something to say which can't be so well said by him elsewhere, he had better stay at home.

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REVIEW The Child's Book of Hymns. A collection of Sacred Poe

try for the use of Sunday-schools and Families. Belfust: Simms and M Intyre, 1838. pp. 24. We congratulate our Sunday-school teachers on the appearance of this little collection of Hymns. It will form a useful companion to the Child's Guide to Christ, with which it may be stitched, as it is printed uniform with it. It is most desirable to impress devotional sentiments on the mind in childhood; and, at a period of life when the memory is so retentive, perhaps the most effectual--and certainly the simplest method is, to tostore it with well-selected Hymns.

We are glad to see in the collection before us, the most beautiful of Watts' Hymns, freed from those objectionable passages which the pious author, if he had had the opportunity, would undoubtedly have himself expunged, when he renouoced the peculiar tenets of Calvinism,

We believe that no Hymns have appeared in the English language so well adapted to the mind of children, and at the same time so truly poetical, as those of Dr. Watts ; hut we are glad to find that the Editor of the Child's Book of Hymns has not restricted himself to the “divine songs," but has introduced Hymns by other authors, which greatly enhance the value of the collection. Of these, the following by Miss Taylor, on “ the Lily of the valley” is one of the most beautiful :

Come, my love, and do not spurn
From a little flower to learn.
See the lily on the bed,
Hanging down its modest head,
While it scarcely can be seen,
Folded in its leaf of green.

Yet we love the lily well
For its sweet and pleasant smell,
And would rather call it ours,
Than the many gayer flowers.
Pretty lilies seem to be,
Emblems of humility.

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DR. CARPENTER'S HARMONY OF THE GOSPELS.

The Rev. Dr. Carpenter, one of the Unitarian ministers of the city of Bristol, has published a second edi. tion of his "Apostolical Harmony of the Gospels,' which he has dedicated; by permission, to her Majesty, the Queen. It is painful to state, that neither the high character of the distinguished author, nor the high rank of her gracious Majesty, nor the high nature of the solemn subject, has been able to moderate the temper of reputed orthodoxy: Anonymous inquiries have been made through the newspapers, with the view of ascer. taining by what influences, and through what kind of persons Dr. Carpenter has obtained permission to dedicate his Harmóty" to her Majesty 2 as if the discovery of these things would lessen the value of the publication, er 'weaken the cause of Unitarianism,which, by the bye, is not advocated in the pages in question. But the anonymous inquirers are, no doubt, afraid lest the sanction of her Majesty's name to any book written by a Unitarian, should be considered as giving countenance to Unitarianism itself. A similar spirit has been manifested within these few weeks, towards the Bishop of Durham, and the Bishop of Norwich, for having entered their names as subscribers to a volume of sermons, which is about to be published by the venerable and venerated William Turner, one of the Unitarian ministers of Newcastle-upon-tyne. We have the pleasure of soine personal acquaintance of the Rev. Dr. Carpenter,

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