The Poetical Works of John Dryden, Esq: Containing Original Poems, Tales, and Translations, with Notes, Volume 4

Front Cover
F. C. and J. Rivington, 1811

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 257 - Neither is it true, that this fineness of raillery is offensive. A witty man is tickled while he is hurt in this manner, and a fool feels it not.
Page 275 - Queen ;" and there I met with that which I had been looking for so long in vain. Spenser had studied Virgil to as much advantage as Milton had done Homer ; and amongst the rest of his excellencies had copied that.
Page 323 - Scarce can our Fields, such Crowds at Tyburn die, With Hemp the Gallows and the Fleet supply. Propose your Schemes, ye Senatorian Band, Whose Ways and Means support the sinking Land; Lest Ropes be wanting in the tempting Spring, To rig another Convoy for the K[in]g.
Page 380 - His fall was destined to a barren strand, A petty fortress, and a dubious hand ; He left the name, at which the world grew pale, To point a moral, or adorn a tale.
Page 256 - How easy it is to call rogue and villain, and that wittily! but how hard to make a man appear a fool, a blockhead, or a knave, without using any of those opprobrious terms!
Page 372 - In full-blown dignity, see Wolsey stand, Law in his voice, and fortune in his hand : To him the church, the realm, their pow'rs consign. Through him the rays of regal bounty shine, Turn'd by his nod the stream of honour flows, His smile alone security bestows...
Page 31 - But swiftness is the vice I only fear. Yet, if you knew me well, you would not...
Page 265 - Satire is a kind of poetry, without a series of action, invented for the purging of our minds ; in which human vices, ignorance, and errors, and all things besides, which are produced from them in every man, are severely reprehended...
Page 380 - Peace courts his hand, but spreads her charms in vain, " Think nothing gain'd," he cries, " till nought remain, On Moscow's walls till Gothic standards fly, And all be mine beneath the polar sky.
Page 83 - To state it fairly; imitation of an author is the most advantageous way for a translator to show himself, but the greatest wrong which can be done to the memory and reputation of the dead.

Bibliographic information