The Savage

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Republished at the "Scrap Book" Office, 1833 - Indians - 324 pages
 

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Page 8 - And they said, Go to, let us build us a city, and a tower whose top may reach unto heaven, and let us make us a name, lest we be scattered abroad upon the face of the whole earth.
Page 86 - There were giants in the earth in those days ; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bare children to them, the same became mighty men which were of old, men of renown.
Page 101 - There is nothing better for a man, than that he should eat and drink, and that he should make his soul enjoy good in his labour.
Page 313 - Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep. All these with ceaseless praise his works behold Both day and night : how often from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive each to other's note, Singing their great Creator...
Page 166 - Why, what should be the fear ? I do not set my life at a pin's fee ; And for my soul, what can it do to that, Being a thing immortal as itself ? It waves me forth again : I'll follow it.
Page 86 - That the sons of God saw the daughters of men that they were fair; And they took them wives of all which they chose.
Page 166 - Still am I call'd. Unhand me, gentlemen. By heaven, I'll make a ghost of him that lets me!
Page 103 - Some people (said he,) have a foolish way of not minding, or pretending not to mind, what they eat. For my part, I mind my belly very studiously, and very t carefully ; for I look upon it, that he who does not mind his belly will hardly mind anything else.
Page 7 - Come unto me, all ye that are weary and heavy-laden, and I will give you rest !" He smiled and wept when he spoke these words.
Page 78 - Such a nation might truly say to corruption, thou art my father, and to the worm, thou art my mother and my sister.

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