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the facramental fymbols and actions, the temper of the heart, "the views of the mind, and every thing appertaining to the right and worthy celebration of the fame. Next he proceeds to reprefent to them the fin and danger of an unbecoming and difhonorable participation of it. This he does in the preceding. and subsequent verses to our text. In the one he fays, "Who"foever fhall eat the bread of the Lord unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord." And in the other, “He that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and "drinketh damnation to himself; not difcerning the Lord's "body." A very concife explication of these words is all we can attend to at prefent. The principal things contained herein are, what is meant by the terms unworthily, and worthily; what to be guilty of the blood of the Lord? what is that damnation, that unworthy partakers eat and drink to themselves?

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Firft, in regard to the word unworthily. All are unworthy in a certain fenfe. All are unworthy of the favour and the grace of God; unworthy of the leaft of all his mercies. There is no merit in any finner, fanctified ot unfanctified. The original-fignifies an unmeetness, unfitnefs, unfuitableness, unprepa redness. To eat and drink unworthily is to attend upon the ⚫rdinance in an unprepared and unfuitable manner; in fuch a temper and under the influence of such habits and practices as are altogether unbecoming the nature, use and end of the inftitution. Both coming unfitly, and staying away, are heinous and condemning fins; but the Apostle feems to intimate that the former is the most base and aggravated.

The word worthy fignifies an attendance upon this facra ment in a way of preparedness and meetnefs according to the gofpel. Perfons are worthy receivers in the fight of God, when they come prepared, having fome proper measure of christian knowledge, fuitable frames of mind, meet defires, and a due fenfe of their need of the foul purifying blood

A chriftian may and the juftifying righteoufnefs of Chrift. be a worthy receiver who approaches the facred table with reverence, humility and devotion, under a feeling fenfe of his finfulness and great unworthiness, tho' he has many fcruples fears and doubts refpecting his ftate. Affurance of grace how. ever defirable is not neceffary to a worthy and acceptable performance of this duty. Even a degreee of backwardness, dullness and deadnefs in the fervice, if these things be involun tary and lamented, do not render us unworthy receivers. One defign of the ordinance is to ftrengthen the weak, encourage the fearful, diffipate our glooms and doubts, and increase our hopes. Wherefore all who have been faithful in felf-examina tion, humbling themfelves for their fins, cafting their fouls upon a crucified Redeemer, and endeavoring after a due preparation of heart, although they still find much corruption and perplexity of spirit, yet they ought to come; the weak in faith we must receive.

Secondly, we are to enquire what is intended by being guilty of the body and blood of the Lord. Unworthy partakers implicitly approve of the conduct of the Jews in crucifying the Saviour of the world. It is implcitly despising and rejecting his atonement, mediation and righteoufnefs. It is like ftabbing the master at his own feast. And unless deep repentance take place, damnation will be the confequence. Many who killed the prince of life, denied and delivered him up in the prefence of Pilate, were brought to evangelical repentance by the preaching of Peter at the gate of the temple called Beautiful If the fins of those who actually imbrued their hands in his blood were pardoned, then furely unworthy partakers, however grofs and wicked their participation may be, tho' they should fo far dishonor the ordinance as to drink common healths at the table, which has been done in modern times, yet even these wretches of profanity, upon their repentance, may obtain forgiveness. Unworthy partaking is far diftant from the unpar

ahis Saviour, defirous to renounce himself and his own righte sufnefs, and to rest upon the mere mercy of God as revealed in the Gospel, refolving to deny every carnal luft, to ftrive against every unruly paffion, and to walk with God in duty; then he ought to draw near to the facred board and partake of the fymbols of his Lord's fufferings.

Secondly, the word examine, fignifies to try or prove, and this is his own perfonal duty. It is not enough that he is examined by the minifter or reprefentatives of the church howe ver they may approve of him or not; this is an injunction incumbent upon each individual. This is not a fervice to be performed once in a perfon's life, but it is ordained as a standing preparative to the facrament. It is true there may be more or lefs time for this performance according to a variety of providential incidents, yet it ought ever to be remembered as a preparative duty. Let a man examine himself as to the difpofition of his heart, the prevailing tenor of his life, his thoughts, words, and actions; his faith, love and repentance; mourn over and confefs to God what is amifs, and folemnly purpose a better and more circumfpect conduct in future, and "fo let him eat "of this bread and drink of this cup." Let him pafs thro one duty to another that Christ may be obeyed and his own spiritual interest promoted.

Thirdly obferve, felf-examination is a common duty, fomewhat like prayer, incumbent upon chriftians at all times. "Examine yourselves whether you be in the faith, prove your "own felves. Let us fearch and try our ways. I commune "with mine own heart faid Afaph, and my fpirit made diligent "fearch." But it is here constituted and made a special duty previous to our attendance upon the Lord's fupper. Can any chriftian approach the table without previous prayer; so neither let him do it without felf- examination, left he be found disobedient to God, and it prove to him as a barren ordinance.

and the juftifying righteoufnefs of Chrift. A chriftian may be a worthy receiver who approaches the facred table with reverence, humility and devotion, under a feeling fenfe of his finfulness and great unworthinefs, tho' he has many fcruples fears and doubts refpecting his ftate. Affurance of grace how. ever defirable is not neceffary to a worthy and acceptable performance of this duty. Even a degreee of backwardness, dullness and deadnefs in the fervice, if these things be involuntary and lamented, do not render us unworthy receivers. One defign of the ordinance is to ftrengthen the weak, encourage the fearful, diffipate our glooms and doubts, and increase our hopes. Wherefore all who have been faithful in self-examiną tion, humbling themfelves for their fins, cafting their fouls upon a crucified Redeemer, and endeavoring after a due preparation of heart, although they ftill find much corruption and perplexity of spirit, yet they ought to come; the weak in faith we must receive.

Secondly, we are to enquire what is intended by being guilty of the body and blood of the Lord. Unworthy partakers implicitly approve of the conduct of the Jews in crucifying the Saviour of the world. It is impicitly defpifing and rejecting his atonement, mediation and righteousness. It is like ftabbing the master at his own feaft. And unless deep repentance take place, damnation will be the confequence. Many who killed the prince of life, denied and delivered him up in the presence of Pilate, were brought to evangelical repentance by the preaching of Peter at the gate of the temple called Beautiful If the fins of thofe who actually imbrued their hands in his blood were pardoned, then furely unworthy partakers, however grofs and wicked their participation may be, tho' they should fo far difhonor the ordinance as to drink common healths at the table, which has been done in modern times, yet even thefe wretches of profanity, upon their repentance, may obtain forgiveness. Unworthy partaking is far diftant from the unpar

ar his Saviour, defirous to renounce himself and his own righte ufnefs, and to rest upon the mere mercy of God as revealed in the Gofpel, refolving to deny every carnal luft, to ftrive against every unruly paffion, and to walk with God in duty; then he ought to draw near to the facred board and partake of the fymbols of his Lord's fufferings.

Secondly, the word examine, fignifies to try or prove, and this is his own personal duty. It is not enough that he is examined by the minifter or reprefentatives of the church howe ver they may approve of him or not; this is an injunction incumbent upon each individual. This is not a fervice to be performed once in a perfon's life, but it is ordained as a ftanding preparative to the facrament. It is true there may be more or lefs time for this performance according to a variety of providential incidents, yet it ought ever to be remembered as a preparative duty. Let a man examine himself as to the difpofition of his heart, the prevailing tenor of his life, his thoughts, words, and actions; his faith, love and repentance; mourn over and confefs to God what is amifs, and folemnly purpose a better and more circumfpect conduct in future, and "fo let him eat "of this bread and drink of this cup." Let him pafs thro one duty to another that Chrift may be obeyed and his own fpiritual intereft promoted.

Thirdly obferve, felf-examination is a common duty, fomewhat like prayer, incumbent upon chriftians at all times. "Examine yourselves whether you be in the faith, prove your "own felves. Let us fearch and try our ways. I commune "with mine own heart faid Afaph, and my fpirit made diligent "fearch." But it is here conftituted and made a special duty previous to our attendance upon the Lord's fupper. Can any chriftian approach the table without previous prayer; fo neither let him do it without felf- examination, left he be found difobedient to God, and it prove to him as a barren ordinance.

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