The Two Natures in the Child of God

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Cosimo, Inc., Mar 1, 2007 - Religion - 60 pages
How does the dual nature of man-both flesh and spirit-challenge our adoration of God? How can we understand this duality within ourselves in order to better celebrate our love for Him? Here, in this concise 1905 work, one of the most respected Bible scholars of the 19th century takes this difficult question to hand and explores, in profound, inspiring depth, how it can become the grounds not for doubt but for reassurance, the best proof we can ever have that we are God's handiwork and a new source of deep solace and joy. British clergyman ETHELBERT WILLIAM BULLINGER (1837-1913) is author of numerous books including Commentary on Revelation, Great Cloud of Witnesses, and How to Enjoy the Bible.
 

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Contents

II
6
III
7
V
8
VII
10
VIII
11
IX
12
X
13
XI
14
XVII
23
XVIII
31
XIX
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XXI
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XXII
36
XXIII
37
XXIV
40
XXV
46

XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVI
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XXVI
47
XXVII
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XXVIII
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Page 8 - ... is the fault and corruption of the nature of every man that naturally is engendered of the offspring of Adam, whereby man is very far gone from original righteousness, and is of his own nature inclined to evil ; so that the flesh lusteth always contrary to the Spirit ; and therefore in every person born into this world, it deserveth God's wrath and damnation.
Page 8 - Original Sin standeth not in the following of Adam, (as the Pelagians do vainly talk;) but it is the fault and corruption of the Nature of every man, that naturally is engendered of the offspring of Adam; whereby man is very far gone from original righteousness, and is of his own nature inclined to evil, so that the flesh lusteth always contrary to the spirit; and therefore in every person born into this world, it deserveth God's wrath and damnation.
Page 8 - God's wrath and damnation. And this infection of nature doth remain, yea in them that are regenerated; whereby the lust of the flesh, called in the Greek, phronema sarkos, which some do expound the wisdom, some sensuality, some the affection, some the desire, of the flesh, is not subject to the Law of God. And although there is no condemnation for them that believe and are baptized, yet the Apostle doth confess, that concupiscence and lust hath of itself the nature of sin.

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