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PRACTICAL AND DOCTRINAL,

BY THE LATE

ELIJAH PARISH, D. D.

WITH A

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

OF THE

AUTHOR.

BOSTON:

PUBLISHED BY CROCKER & BREWSTER,

No. 50, CORNHILL.

1826.

7233 iP28 54

DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS, to wit:

District Clerk's Office. BE IT REMEMBERED, that on the twenty-eighth day of April, A. D. 1826, in the fiftieth year of the Independence of the United States of America, Moses P. Parish, of the said District, has deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as Proprietor, in the words following, to wit:

“Sermons, Practical and Doctrinal. By the late Elijah Parsh, D. D. With a Biographical Sketch of the Author."

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, intitled, 'An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies, of maps, charts and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies. during the times therein men. tioned;" and also to an act, intitled, “An act supplementary to an act, intitled, An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned; and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving and etching historical, and other prints."

JNO. W. DAVIS,
Clerk of the District of Massachusetts.

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BIOGRAPHICAL

SKETCH.

The remark, which Addison, in the first number of the Spectator, has so playfully made, that a reader never peruses a book with satisfaction until he knows the personal qualities of the author, seems to be peculiarly true when applied to orations and sermons. In reading a spoken composition, our recollections of fancy naturally recur to the speaker. We either remember his manner and read every sentence in connexion with it, or, if we have had no knowledge of the author, we supply the deficiency by a picture of the imagination. We hear, in the ear of the mind, the fervour and eloquence with which he poured forth his thought. His cadence, his mien, his gestures accompany every period, and mingle with every sentiment. In cases, therefore, in which the imagination must be busy, it is important that it should be guided by truth ; and since these Discourses will not suffer from the

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