An Historical Account of the Incorporated Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts: Containing Their Foundation, Proceedings, and the Success of Their Missionaries in the British Colonies, to the Year 1728

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Joseph Downing, 1730 - African Americans - 356 pages
 

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Page xxix - ... to ordain and make such laws and ordinances, for the good and welfare of the said plantation, as to them, from time to time, shall be thought requisite and meet: so always, as the same be not contrary to the laws and statutes of this our realm of England...
Page 236 - Regard shewed them in any religious Respect. Their Marriages were performed by mutual Consent only, without the Blessing of the Church; they were buried by those of their own Country or Complexion, in the common Field, without any Christian Office; perhaps some ridiculous Heathen Rites were performed at the Grave, by some of their own People.
Page xxii - ... and do all other matters and things in as ample manner and form as any other our liege subjects of this...
Page xx - Presents, shall be one Body Politick and Corporate, in Deed and in Name, by the Name of...
Page xxii - Perfons able and capable in Law, to fue and be fued, plead and be impleaded, anfwer and be anfwered unto, defend and be defended, in all or any...
Page xv - Whereas, We are credibly Informed, That in many of Our Plantations, Colonies, and Factories beyond the Seas, belonging to Our Kingdom of England, the Provision for Ministers is very mean, and many others of our said Plantations, Colonies, and Factories are wholly Destitute and Unprovided of a Maintenance for Ministers, and the Publick Worship of God ; and for lack of Support...
Page xxi - ... privileges, jurisdictions, franchises, and other hereditaments whatsoever, lying and being in Great Britain, or any part thereof, of whatsoever nature, kind or quality, or value they be, in fee and in perpetuity, not exceeding the yearly value of one thousand pounds, beyond reprises; also estates for lives, and for years, and all other manner of goods, chattels and things whatsoever...
Page 149 - Welsh people in those towns and neighbouring parts, who had been bred up members of the church of England, were here unhappily fallen into quakerism, for want of a minister ; as being disposed to follow that, rather than have no form of religion, and who were ready to return back to the Church of England.
Page 286 - ... Soon after Mr. Moor's arrival at Albany, 60 miles from the Mohawk settlement, two Indians came and one thus addressed him : — "Father we are come to express our joy at your safe arrival and that you have escapt the dangers of a dreadful sea, which you have crost, I hear, to instruct us in Beligion. It only grieves us that you are come in time of war, when it is uncertain whether you will live or die with us.
Page 257 - Difficulty is, that they are utter Strangers to our Language, and we to theirs ; and the Gift of Tongues being now ceased, there is no Means left of instructing them in the Doctrines of the Christian Religion. And this, I own, is a real Difficulty, as long as it continues, and as far as it reaches. But, if I am rightly informed, many of the Negroes, who are grown Persons when they come over, do of themselves attain so much of our Language, as enables them to understand, and to be understood, in Things...

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