A New Dictionary of the English Language, Part 1

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W. Pickering, 1839 - English language - 886 pages
 

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Scott Garfield Selby 03191980 Land of Living Skies

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Page 289 - Lastly, extortion is an abuse of public justice, which consists in any officer's unlawfully taking, by colour of his office, from any man, any money or thing of value, that is not due to him, or more than is due, or before it is due.
Page 152 - Ideas thus made up of several simple ones put together I call " complex ; " such as are beauty, gratitude, a man, an army, the universe; which, though complicated of various simple ideas or complex ideas made up of simple ones, yet are, when the mind pleases, considered each by itself as one entire thing, and signified by one name.
Page 457 - THE other remaining offence, that of kidnapping, being [ 219 ] the forcible abduction or stealing away of a man, woman, or child, from their own country, and sending them into another, was capital by the Jewish law.
Page 295 - So that a farmer, firmarius, was one who held his lands upon payment of a rent or feorme : though at present, by a gradual departure from the original sense, the word farm is brought to signify the very estate or lands so held upon farm or rent.
Page 421 - When by thus comparing a number of cases, agreeing in some circumstances, but differing in others, and all attended •with the same result, a philosopher connects, as a general law of nature, the event with its physical cause, he is said to proceed according to the method of induction.
Page 427 - The smallpox, so fatal and so general amongst us, is here entirely harmless by the invention of ingrafting, which is the term they give it. There is a set of old women who make it their business to perform the operation every autumn, in the month of September, when the great heat is abated. People send to one another to know if any of their family has a mind to have the smallpox ; they make parties for this purpose, and when they are met...
Page 394 - Thus we come to have more originals, and more that appear what they are; we have more humour, because every man follows his own, and takes a pleasure, perhaps a pride, to shew it.
Page 277 - First, essence may be taken for the being of any thing, whereby it is what it is. And thus the real internal, but generally, in substances, unknown constitution of things, whereon their discoverable qualities depend, may be called their essence.
Page 14 - ... particular ideas received from particular objects to become general; which is done by considering them as they are in the mind such appearances, separate from all other existences and the circumstances of real existence, as time, place, or any other concomitant ideas. This is called ABSTRACTION, whereby ideas taken from particular beings become general representatives of all of the same kind; and their names, general names, applicable to whatever exists conformable to such abstract ideas.
Page 113 - These were festal chansons for enlivening the merriments of the Christmas celebrity ; and not such religious songs as are current at this day with the common people, under the same title, and which were substituted by those enemies of innocent and useful mirth, the Puritans.

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