Sermons on War

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Peirce and Williams, 1829 - War - 92 pages
 

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Page 92 - And I will cut off the chariot from Ephraim, and the horse from Jerusalem, and the battle bow shall be cut off: and he shall speak peace unto the heathen : and his dominion shall be from sea even to sea, and from the river even to the ends of the earth.
Page 32 - Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather give place unto wrath : for it is written, Vengeance is mine ; I will repay, saith the Lord. Therefore, if thine enemy hunger, feed him ; if he thirst, give him drink : for in so doing thou shalt heap coals of fire on his head. Be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good.
Page 7 - Let the high praises of God be in their mouth, and a two-edged sword in their hand ; To execute vengeance upon the heathen, and punishments upon the people; To bind their kings with chains, and their nobles with fetters of iron ; To execute upon them the judgment written: this honour have all his saints.
Page 35 - Ye lust, and have not ; ye kill, and desire to have, and cannot obtain ; ye fight and war, yet ye have not, because ye ask not ; ye ask and receive not, because ye ask amiss, that ye may consume it upon your lusts.
Page 86 - Yet held it more humane, more heavenly, first By winning words to conquer willing hearts, And make persuasion do the work of fear...
Page 63 - And the soldiers likewise demanded of him, saying, And what shall we do? And he said unto them, Do violence to no man, neither accuse any falsely; and be content with your wages.
Page 7 - My goodness, and my fortress; my high tower, and my deliverer; my shield, and he in whom I trust ; who subdueth my people under me.
Page 17 - No body can be healthful without exercise, neither natural body nor politic; and certainly to a kingdom or estate a just and honourable war is the true exercise. A civil war indeed, is like the heat of a fever; but a foreign war is like the heat of exercise, and serveth to keep the body in health; for in a slothful peace both courages will effeminate and manners corrupt.
Page 49 - For every battle of the warrior is with confused noise, And garments rolled in blood; But this shall be with burning and fuel of fire.
Page 58 - He looked pale, and big drops of perspiration stood on his manly forehead; but he spoke not — his agony appeared unutterable. I secretly wished him death ; a mercy, I believe, that was not very long withheld.

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