The Triflers: To which are Added The Rout, Or a Sketch of Modern Manners ; and The Farmer's Son, a Moral Tale

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Lackington, Allen, and Company, 1806 - English poetry - 177 pages
 

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Page 58 - And Caesar's spirit, ranging for revenge, With Ate by his side come hot from hell, Shall in these confines with a monarch's voice Cry 'Havoc!' and let slip the dogs of war; That this foul deed shall smell above the earth With carrion men, groaning for burial.
Page 6 - Sir, (quoth the lawyer,) not to flatter ye, You have as good and fair a battery As heart can wish, and need not shame The proudest man alive to claim...
Page 12 - ... jellies, sweetmeats, ice-creams and the like, they decided on the merits of the several performances, from which they selected three, which were deemed the best, and of course entitled to prizes, which her ladyship distributed to the respective authors ; a pompous bouquet of flowers to the first, a myrtle wreath to the second, and a sprig of myrtle to the third. These were then usually presented by the successful candidate to some lady, who wore them in her hair or her bosom the next evening...
Page 72 - This quality of looking forward into futurity seems the unavoidable condition of a being whose motions are gradual, and whose life is progressive ; as his powers are limited, he must use means for the attainment of his ends, and intend first what he performs last ; as by continual advances from his first stage of existence, he is perpetually varying the horizon of his prospects, he must always discover new motives of action, new excitements of fear...
Page 42 - twill bring? " I shall add but one particular more; which is, that my scheme would most certainly provide for the poor, and that by an infallible (perhaps the only infallible) method, by removing the rich. Where there are no rich, there will of consequence be found no poor? for Providence hath in...
Page 72 - ... powers are limited, he must use means for the attainment of his ends, and intend first what he performs last ; as by continual advances from his first stage of existence, he is perpetually varying the horizon of his prospects, he must always discover new motives of action, new excitements of fear, and allurements of desire.
Page 62 - Weft, for the use of the disaffected in this part of England, (who were supposed to have projected an insurrection, in order to co-operate with that in Scotland and the north of England) Mr.
Page 66 - In the year 1758, Mr. Allen purchased the manor of Claverton, where, after having repaired, improved and built a gallery in the church; finding that the rector had several young gentlemen of family and fortune under his care; and a very indifferent old house for their accommodation, Mr. Allen offered to build him a room, which he immediately executed : building a room twenty-five feet by sixteen, with two...
Page 14 - VIRG. the time of the accession of Queen Anne, to the reign of George the Second ; being banished, as . he calls it, into Ireland, took for his motto, in the laft ftage of his lite, " Vive la Bagatelle;" "May the art of Trifling flourish and abound!
Page 70 - At the first visit which I made at Prior Park, I met Dr. Warburton for the first time, whom I ventured to pronounce one of the politest men I had ever seen. Those who only know him as engaged in controversy may be surprised at this. But I found him so attentive to every one who spoke, particularly to myself, who am the worst of all possible speakers, setting everything that I said in the clearest light, and, in short, paying such deference to his inferiors, as most of the company were...

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