Suffer the Future, Policy Choices in Southern Africa

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Harvard University Press, 1980 - History - 311 pages
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'Suffer the Future' is a balanced account aimed at making general readers, as well as students of international problems, aware of the realistic alternatives for policy in and toward southern Africa.
 

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Contents

The Grounding of Politics
3
The Ascendancy of Afrikanerdom
28
The Response of the Underprivileged
61
Economic Strengths and Vulnerabilities
91
Copyright

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About the author (1980)

Robert Irwin Rotberg (born April 11, 1935) is an American who served as President emeritus of the World Peace Foundation (1993-2010). An American professor in governance and foreign affairs, he was director of the Program on Intrastate Conflict, Conflict Prevention, and Conflict Resolution at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government (1999-2010), and has served in administrative positions at Tufts University and Lafayette College. In 2003-2004, he served as a member of the Secretary of State's Advisory Panel on Africa, and was a Presidential appointee to the Council of the National Endowment for the Humanities. In 2013 Rotberg became the Fulbright Research Chair in Political Development at the Balsillie School of International Affairs in Waterloo, Canada. Rotberg attened Oberlin College for his undergraduate degree. He completed his graduate studies at Princeton University, and obtained his doctorate at St Antony's College, Oxford University while on a Rhodes Scholarship. He is the author of many books on US foreign policy. These include: Transformative Political Leadership: Making a Difference in the Developing World (2012); Governance and Leadership in Africa (2007); When States Fail: Causes and Consequences (2004); Truth v. Justice: The Morality of Truth Commissions (2000); and From Massacres to Genocide: The Media, Public Policy and Humanitarian Crises (1996).

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