Tales and Novels, Volumes 17-18

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Harper & Brothers, 1839
 

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Page 68 - I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer, as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?
Page 68 - Shylock, we would have moneys'; you say so; You, that did void your rheum upon my beard, And foot me as you spurn a stranger cur Over your threshold; moneys is your suit. What should I say to you? Should I not say 'Hath a dog money? Is it possible A cur can lend three thousand ducats?
Page 98 - With that, methought, a legion of foul fiends Environ'd me, and howled in mine ears Such hideous cries, that, with the very noise, I trembling wak'd, and, for a season after, Could not believe but that I was in hell, — Such terrible impression made my dream.
Page 212 - Certainly, in taking revenge, a man is but even with his enemy; but in passing it over, he is superior; for it is a prince's part to pardon: and Solomon, I am sure, saith, 'It is the glory of a man to pass by an offence.
Page 67 - Signior Antonio, many a time and oft In the Rialto you have rated* me About my moneys and my usances :* Still have I borne it with a patient shrug; For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe. You call me misbeliever, cut-throat, dog, And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine, And all for use of that which is mine own.
Page 49 - Very well — very well indeed ! This man seems to know what he is about.' These encomiums warmed me, but did not overset me. I knew where I should have the pull, which was in the third act, and reserved myself accordingly. At this period I threw out all my fire, and as the contrasted passions of joy for the merchant's losses and grief for the elopement of Jessica open a fine field for an actor's powers, I had the good fortune to please beyond my warmest expectations.
Page 49 - The trial scene wound up the fulness of my reputation. Here I was well listened to, and here I made such a silent yet forcible impression on my audience, that I retired from this great attempt most perfectly satisfied.
Page 215 - The bore is not a ruminating animal, — carnivorous, not sagacious, prosing, long-winded, tenacious of life, though not vivacious. The bore is good for promoting sleep ; but though he causeth sleep in others it is uncertain whether he ever sleeps himself; as few can keep awake in his company long enough to see. It is supposed that when he sleeps it is with his mouth open. The bore is usually considered a harmless creature, or of that class of irrational bipeds who hurt only themselves.
Page 49 - I must confess, was one of the most flattering and intoxicating of my whole life. No money, no title could purchase what I felt; and let no man tell me after this what Fame will not inspire a man to do, and how far the attainment of it will not remunerate his greatest labours. By G—, sir, though I was not worth fifty pounds in the world at that time, yet, let me tell you, I was Charles the Great for that night.
Page 48 - Sir, (said the veteran,-) I eyed through the slit of the curtain, and was glad to see there, as I wished, in such a cause, to be tried by a special jury. "When I made my appearance in the green-room, dressed for the part, with my red hat on my head, my piqued beard, loose black gown, &c.

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