A History of the Church, from the Earliest Ages to the Reformation

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Baldwin and Cradock, 1831 - Church history - 738 pages
 

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Contents

Some individual reformers of the fifteenth century John
12
PAGE
16
On the numbers discipline doctrine and morality of the primitive
17
The progress of Christianity from the year 200 A D till
31
Persecutions of several Roman Emperors
41
the charge of superstition though adorned by many virtues 47 48 202211 The Edict of Severus against the Christians remained in force
49
On the Heresies of the three first Centuries
58
The first appearances of corruption in the Church necessarily pro
59
Theodotus was expelled from the Church of Rome while Victor
67
The Novatians the earliest ecclesiastical reformers were con
70
Constantine the Great
75
Constantine the Great
76
The internal administration of the Church remained in the hands
82
The Arian Controversy
88
Those metaphysical controversies which exercised only the wit
89
It was then dissolved as having done all that was necessary for
96
Damasus at Rome and Ambrose at Milan zealously defended
100
The decline and fall of Paganism
105
Constantine published an edict in favour of divination
106
He made his celebrated attempt to rebuild the Temple of Jeru
110
Honorius abolished the gladiatorial games
116
From the fall of Paganism to the death of Justinian 348567
119
Leo the Great was raised to the See of Rome zealous in the
125
Note on certain ecclesiastical writers M345
135
Chapter XFrom the death of Justinian to that of Charlemagne 567814
142
AD PAQK
151
The substance of the 29th canon of the Council of Chalcedon
152
Pontificate of Gregory
154
Of his claim to the title of Great and the mischief occasioned
157
St Austin with forty Benedictines introduced Christianity into
160
Charlemagne was proclaimed Emperor of the West He exerted
165
Montanus began to prophesy in Phrygia in company with Maxi
170
ravages were committed by the Circumcellions 169 354430 Augustin a Numidian embraced the Manichean opinions
172
The Semipelagian doctrines began to spread in France and seem
180
PAGE
191
On the Schism between the Greek and Latin Churches
193
Photius was raised to the See of Constantinople and then he
197
Review of the AnteNicene Church
199
The Roman Synod against Novatian was attended by sixty Bishops 33
203
The Government and Projects of the Church during
236
Section II
276
Henry advanced to Rome and after two repulses in two successive
288
PART IV
301
The teachers of philosophy were instrumental in bringing Diocle
303
of investiture The ceremony of coronation was to follow
307
PAGE
337
Pierre de Bruys originated the sect of Petrobrussians who rejected
350
Alexander III published in a Council at Tours an edict against
356
For what reasons any general notice of the Monastic Ordershas
362
Benedict of Nursia instituted a new order
375
The Cistertian Order was founded in its neighbourhood and
381
Section IV
385
MJ PAGE
386
Gregory X suppressed several Mendicants and distributed the sect 3
393
From the Death of Innocent to that of Boniface VIII
414
PAGE
420
Chapter XXI
440
The Monophysite opinions of Eutyches were confirmed in a Council
449
PAGE
465
PART V
475
PAGE
486
The attempts which were made to remove the acknowledged
497
The imputed opinions and savage persecution of Dulcinus
503
PAGE
510
The cruelty of Urban towards some cardinals suspected of having
517
Justinian ascended the throne and held it for nearly forty years
527
A decree for the Decennial Meetings of General Councils was pro
564
Jan 10 After having been cited before the Council and con
573
History of the Hussites
581
History of the Greek Church after its Separation
604
The Council was removed to Florence and after great debates
623
Negociations were opened between the Armenian and Greek
629
iEneas Sylvius after having been engaged in the service both of the Emperor and the Holy See was at length raised to the pontifi
640
Sixtus IV succeeded The circumstances of his dispute with Flo
647
He bestowed the newlydiscovered regions on the Crown of Spain
653
On various Attempts to reform or subvert the Church
702
A general council was assembled at Vienne with three professed
707
John Reuchlin and his admirer Erasmus
717
He entered the lists in public disputation against Abelard at Sens
719

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Page 260 - And I saw an Angel come down from heaven, having the key of the bottomless pit and a great chain in his hand. And he laid hold on the dragon, that old serpent, which is the Devil, and Satan, and bound him a thousand years, and cast him into the bottomless pit, and shut him up, and set a seal upon him, that he should deceive the nations no more, till the thousand years should be fulfilled: and after that he must be loosed a little season.
Page 298 - I say unto you, inasmuch as ye have done it unto the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.
Page 507 - And I saw another angel fly in the midst of heaven, having the everlasting gospel to preach unto them that dwell on the earth, and to every nation, and kindred, and tongue, and people, saying with a loud voice, Fear God, and give glory to him; for the hour of his judgment is come: and worship him that made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and the fountains of waters.
Page 567 - And if he shall neglect to hear them, tell it unto the church: but if he neglect to hear the church, let him be unto thee as a heathen man and a publican.
Page 436 - See, I have this day set thee over the nations and over the kingdoms, to root out, and to pull down, and to destroy, and to throw down, to build, and to plant.
Page 31 - From these facts, it is evident, that, first, about the end of the second, and the beginning of the third century...
Page 152 - ... for the bodies of the holy Apostles, Peter and Paul, are so resplendent with miracles and terrific prodigies in their own Churches, that no one can approach them without great awe, even for the purpose of adoring them. When my predecessor, of happy memory, wished to change some silver ornament which was placed over the most holy body of St. Peter, though at the distance of almost fifteen feet, a warning of no small terror appeared to him. Even I myself wished to make some alteration near the...
Page 163 - Whether the divine law did not permit a valiant and warlike people to dethrone a pusillanimous and indolent monarch, who was incapable of discharging any of the functions of royalty, and to substitute in his place one more worthy to rule, and who had already rendered most important services to the state?
Page 13 - ... at length these men, though really criminal, and deserving exemplary punishment, began to be commiserated as people who were destroyed, not out of regard to the public welfare, but only to gratify the cruelty of one man" ("Annals,
Page 10 - ... every rank, of both sexes likewise, are accused, and will be accused. Nor has the contagion of this superstition seized cities only, but the lesser towns also, and the open country.

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