Karl Barth: Theologian of Freedom

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Fortress Press, 1991 - Religion - 348 pages
Ranked by many among the great theologians of church history, Karl Barth was the leading European theologian in the first half of this century. His 1919 Romans signaled the end of the nineteenth century liberal theology, and his Church Dogmatics reconstructed Christian doctrine in a way that was both classical and modern. A champion of the freedom of the Christian community, Barth's theology links "the Bible and the newspaper," Christian doctrine with the ethical issues of politics and economics, justice and peace. This volume concentrates on the key texts and ideas in Barth's thought. It presents the essential Barth for students and the general reader. Clifford Green's introductory essay and comments on the selected texts set Barth in his historical context, chart the development of his thought and indicate the significance of his theology in the development of Christian theology as a whole.

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Contents

V
46
VI
66
VII
90
VIII
98
IX
114
X
140
XI
148
XII
151
XXIII
227
XXIV
234
XXV
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XXVI
265
XXVII
296
XXVIII
301
XXIX
319
XXX
322

XIII
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XIV
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XVI
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XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
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XXII
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
341
XXXVIII
346
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Page 125 - But now the righteousness of God without the law is manifested, being witnessed by the law and the prophets; Even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe...
Page 137 - Then was the iron, the clay, the brass, the silver, and the gold, broken to pieces together, and became like the chaff of the summer threshingfloors; and the wind carried them away, that no place was found for them: and the stone that smote the image became a great mountain, and filled the whole earth.
Page 104 - What shall we drink?' or 'What shall we wear?' For the pagans run after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them.
Page 106 - I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you clothed me, I was sick and you visited me, I was in prison and you came to me.
Page 104 - Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds from the mouth of God'.
Page 109 - No one can serve two masters; for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and mammon.
Page 112 - So whatever you wish that men would do to you, do so to them; for this is the law and the prophets.
Page 133 - God without the law is manifested, being witnessed by the law and the prophets; even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all, and upon all them that believe; for there is no difference : for all have sinned and come short of the glory of God; being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus...
Page 122 - Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools, and changed the g'lory of the incorruptible God for the likeness of an image of corruptible man, and of birds, and fourfooted beasts, and creeping things. Wherefore God gave them up in the lusts of their hearts unto uncleanness...
Page 110 - Take no gold, nor silver, nor copper in your belts, no bag for your journey, nor two tunics, nor sandals, nor a staff; for the laborer deserves his food.

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About the author (1991)

Karl Barth was described by Pope Pius XII as the most important theologian since Thomas Aquinas, the Swiss Pastor and Theologian, and Barth continues to be a major influence on students, scholars and preachers. Barth's theology found its expression mainly through his closely reasoned fourteen part magnum opus, Die Kirchliche Dogmatik. Having taken over 30 years to write, the Church Dogmatics is regarded as one of the most important theological works of all time, and represents the pinnacle of Barth's achievements as a theologian.

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