Journal of an embassy from the governor-general of India to the court of Ava ... 1827, with an appendix by prof. Buckland and mr. Clift

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Page 363 - Then thou shalt see, and flow together, and thine heart shall fear, and be enlarged; because the abundance of the sea shall be converted unto thee, the forces of the Gentiles shall come unto thee.
Page 19 - Consul in the said dominions, who will dispose of the same according to the tenor of the British law. In like manner the property of Burmese subjects dying under the same circumstances, in any part of the British dominions, shall be made over to the minister or other authority delegated by His Burmese Majesty, to the Supreme Government of India.
Page 20 - Rangoon ; upon the future payment of a similar sum at that place, within one hundred days from this date, with the proviso as above, the army will evacuate the dominions of his Majesty the King of Ava, with the least possible delay ; leaving the remaining moiety of the sum total to be paid by equal annual instalments in two years, from this 24th day of February 1826, AD, through the Consul, or Resident in Ava or Pegu, on the part of the Honourable the East India Company.
Page 19 - The good and faithful ally of the British Government, His Majesty the King of Siam, having taken a part in the present war, will, to the fullest extent, as far as regards His Majesty and his subjects, be included in the above treaty.
Page 17 - Government to maintain the relations of peace and amity between the nations, and as part indemnification to the British Government for the expenses of the war, his Majesty the King of Ava agrees to pay the sum of one crore of rupees.
Page 45 - The English are the inhabitants of a small and remote island. What business have they to come in ships from so great a distance, to dethrone kings, and take possession of countries they have no right to ? They contrive to conquer and govern the black foreigners, the people of castes, who have puny frames, and no courage.
Page 363 - The sun shall be no more thy light by day; neither for brightness shall the moon give light unto thee: but the LORD shall be unto thee an everlasting light, and thy God thy glory.
Page 168 - The husband poured water upon the cloth from a cocoa-nut shell, pronouncing, after the priest, these words : ' Let the deceased, and all present, partake of the merit of the ceremonies now performing.' The assembly pronounced the words, ' "We partake ; ' or, ' "We accept.' The pouring of water upon the ground is considered by the Burmans the most solemn vow. It is as if it were calling the earth to witness, or rather the guardian Nat, or tutelary spirit of the place, who, it is supposed, will hold...
Page 168 - The pouring of water upon the ground is considered by the Burmans the most solemn vow. It is as if it were calling the earth to witness, or rather the guardian Nat, or tutelary spirit of the place, who, it is supposed, will hold the vow in remembrance, should men forget it. Two other priests followed the first, repeating the same, or similar prayers and ceremonies. After this, the company retired to some distance, and fire was set to the funeral pile. Notwithstanding- the pomp and parade of this...
Page 51 - This person was determined to fight. He sent, I think, an Armenian as a spy to Rangoon, who brought back news that the English were preparing to attack his stockade. The messenger was put to death for bringing accounts tending to discourage the troops ; but the execution was hardly over, when the British troops presented themselves before the stockade. My informant, and other persons, afterwards gave a most appalling account of the attack of the " Balus,

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