Bibliotheca Technologica: Or: A Philological Library of Literary Arts and Sciences. Viz. I. Theology ... XXV. Miscellanies

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S. Idle, 1737 - Knowledge, Theory of - 651 pages
 

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Page 284 - Tis hard to say if greater want of skill Appear in writing or in judging ill ; But of the two less dangerous is th' offence To tire our patience than mislead our sense : Some few in that, but numbers err in this; Ten censure wrong for one who writes amiss ; A fool might once himself alone expose ; Now one in verse makes many more in prose.
Page 296 - Of all the causes which conspire to blind Man's erring judgment, and misguide the mind, What the weak head with strongest bias rules, Is Pride, the never-failing vice of. fools. Whatever nature has in worth denied, , She gives in large recruits of needful pride ; For as in bodies, thus in souls, we find What wants in blood and spirits, swell'd with wind : Pride, where wit fails, steps in to our defence, And fills up all the mighty void of sense.
Page 293 - Tis not a lip, or eye, we beauty call, But the joint force and full result of all. Thus when we view some well-proportion'd dome, (The world's just wonder, and ev'n thine, O Rome!) No single parts unequally surprise, All comes united to th' admiring eyes; No monstrous height, or breadth or length appear; The whole at once is bold and regular.
Page 299 - At every trifle scorn to take offence ; That always shows great pride or little sense : Those heads, as stomachs, are not sure the best Which nauseate all, and nothing can digest. Yet let not each gay turn thy rapture move ; For fools admire, but men of sense approve ; As things seem large which we through mists descry, Dulness is ever apt to magnify.
Page 193 - For not to have been dipt in Lethe lake, Could save the son of Thetis from to die ; But that blind bard did him immortal make With verses, dipt in dew of...
Page 301 - Modeftly bold, and humanly fevere ; " Who to a friend, his faults can freely fhow, " And gladly praife the merit of a foe ?
Page 294 - May boldly deviate from the common track ; Great wits sometimes may gloriously offend, And rise to faults true critics dare not mend. From vulgar bounds with brave disorder part. And snatch a grace beyond the reach of art, Which, without passing through the judgment, gains The heart, and all its end at once attains.
Page 291 - tis but half a judge's task, to know. 'Tis not enough, taste, judgment, learning, join; In all you speak, let truth and candour shine: That not alone what to your sense is due All may allow; but seek your friendship too. Be silent always when you doubt your sense; And speak...
Page 300 - And fpeak, tho' fure, with feeming diffidence : Some pofitive, perfifting fops we know, Who, if once wrong, will needs be always fo ; But you, with pleafure own your errors paft, And make each day a Critic on the laft.
Page 285 - One clear, unchang'd, and univerfal light, Life, force, and beauty muft to all impart, At once the fource, and end, and teft of art. Art from that fund each juft fupply provides, Works without fhow, and without pomp prefides :. 75 In fome fair body thus th' informing foul With fpirits feeds, with vigour fills the whole, Each motion guides, and ev'ry nerve fuftains ; Itfelf unfeen, but in th...

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