The Argonautics, tr. into Engl. verse with notes by W. Preston, Volume 3

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Page 205 - The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them. And the cow and the bear shall feed; their young ones shall lie down together: and the lion shall eat straw like the ox. And the sucking child shall play on the hole of the asp, and the weaned child shall put his hand on the cockatrice
Page 231 - Thammuz came next behind, Whose annual wound in Lebanon allured The Syrian damsels to lament his fate In amorous ditties, all a summer's day; While smooth Adonis from his native rock Ran purple to the sea, supposed with blood Of Thammuz yearly wounded...
Page 133 - OF Man's first disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heavenly muse, that on the secret top Of Oreb, or of Sinai, didst inspire That shepherd, who first taught the chosen seed, In the beginning, how the heavens and earth Rose out of chaos...
Page 205 - Ipsae lacte domum referent distenta capellae ubera, nee magnos metuent armenta leones ; ipsa tibi blandos fundent cunabula flores. Occidet et serpens, et fallax herba veneni occidet ; Assyrium vulgo nascetur amomum.
Page 276 - And they came unto the brook of Eshcol and cut down from thence a branch with one cluster of grapes and they bare it between two upon a staff; and they brought of the pomegranates and of the figs.
Page 193 - Nox erat, et terras animalia fessa per omnes Alituum pecudumque genus sopor altus habebat: Cum pater in ripa gelidique sub aetheris axe Aeneas, tristi turbatus pectora bello, Procubuit, seramque dedit per membra quietem.
Page 219 - ... evidently, affect us not in proportion to those of Homer. His characters of valour are much alike : even that of Turnus...
Page 192 - Tempus erat, quo prima quies mortalibus aegris incipit et dono divum gratissima serpit.
Page 120 - ... and generosity of private persons afforded. The same spirit of enterprise which had prompted so many gentlemen to take arms in defence of the oppressed pilgrims in Palestine, incited others to declare themselves the patrons and avengers of injured innocence at home. When the final reduction of the Holy Land under the dominion of Infidels put an end to these foreign expeditions, the latter was the only employment left for the activity and courage of adventurers. To check the insolence of overgrown...
Page 197 - Alma parens, confessa deam, qualisque videri Caelicolis et quanta solet ; dextraque prehensum Continuit, roseoque haec insuper addidit ore: 'Nate, quis indomitas tantus dolor excitat iras?

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