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" They heard, and were abashed, and up they sprung Upon the wing; as when men, wont to watch On duty, sleeping found by whom they dread, Rouse and bestir themselves ere well awake. Nor did they not perceive the evil plight In which they were, or the fierce... "
Language, People, Numbers: Corpus Linguistics and Society - Page 143
edited by - 2008 - 327 pages
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The Spectator: ...

1737
...Grtecifms, and fometimes Hebraifms, into the Language of his Poem ; as towards the Beginning of it. Nor did they not perceive the evil Plight In *which they were, or the fierce Pains not feel. Tet to tbeir Gen^ral's Voice they foon obey'd. , . Whojhall tev.pt with...
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Paradise Lost: A Poem in Twelve Books, Volume 1

John Milton - English poetry - 1750
...equal to that of his fentiments. I have been the more particular in thefe obfervations on Milton's did they not perceive the evil plight In which .they were, or the fierce pains not feel. Yet to their general's voice they foon obey'd. 4 --Who (hall tempt with...
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Paradise Lost: A Poem, in Twelve Books. The Last Edition. The Author John Milton

John Milton - Fall of man - 1754
...wont to watch On duty , deeping found by whom they dread , Rouze and beftir themfelves ere well awake. Nor did they not perceive the evil plight In which they were , or the fierce pains not feel ; Yet to their General's voice they foon obey'd , Innumerable ! As when the...
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The new universal English dictionary. Buchanan

Nathan Bailey - 1760
...к frequent in old writers ; when we borrowed the French word we borrowed the fyntax, obéira* Rot, Nor did they not perceive the evil plight In which they were, or the fierce paini not feel, Yet to their general's voice they foon otej'J. Millo«. OB'JECT, the matter...
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Paradise Lost: A Poem, in Twelve Books. The Author John Milton. The Sixth ...

John Milton - 1763
...Gra:cifms, and fometimes Hebraifms, into the language of his poem ; as towards the beginning of it. Nor did they not perceive the evil plight In which they were, or the fierce pains not feel. Yet to their general's voice they foon obey'd. — Who mall tempt with wand'ring...
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A Short Introduction to English Grammar: With Critical Notes

Robert Lowth - English language - 1763 - 196 pages
...the fame objeftion ; and not being fo familiar to the ear, immediately offends it. " That part of " Nor did they not perceive the evil plight In which they were, or the fierce pains not feel." Milton, PL i. 335. PREPOSITIONS have a Government of Cafes ; and in Englifh...
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Paradise Lost: A Poem in Twelve Books. The Author John Milton. According to ...

John Milton - 1767 - 348 pages
...wont to watch On duty, fleeping found by whom they dread, Roufe and beftir themfehres ere well awake. Nor did they not perceive the evil plight In which they were, or the fierce pains not feel 5 Vet to their general's voice they foon obey'd Innumerable. As when the...
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A Short Introduction to English Grammar: With Critical Notes

Robert Lowth - English language - 1774 - 161 pages
...Phalaris, p. 515. "That we need not, iwr d» na, confine the purpofc: of GOJ." Id. Sctraon J. «« Ner .*' Nor did they not perceive the evil plight . . In which they were, or the fierce pains not feel." ...'•' Milton, PL i. 335, PREPOSITIONS have a Government of Cafes: .and...
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Bell's Edition: The Poets of Great Britain Complete from Chaucer to ...

English poetry - 1776
...Grscifms, and fometimes Hebraifms, into the language of his Poem ; as towards the beginning of it ; Nor did they not perceive the evil plight In which they were, or the fierce Tia;ns not feel. Yet to their Ken'ral's voice they foon obcy'd. who fliaU tempt with wantTring...
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The Spectator, Volume 4

1778
...Grzcifms, and fometimes Hebraifms, into the language of his poem j as to\s-ards the beginning of it. Nor did they not perceive the evil plight • In which they were, or the fierce pains not feel. Yet to their gen'ral's voice they foon obey'd — — •———Who fhall...
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