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" Adam, though his rational faculties be supposed, at the very first, entirely perfect, could not have inferred from the fluidity and transparency of water that it would suffocate him, or from the light and warmth of fire that it would consume him. "
Criterion; Or, Rules by which the True Miracles Recorded in the New ... - Page 14
by John Douglas - 1824 - 260 pages
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Essays and treatises on several subjects

David Hume - Economics - 1760 - 352 pages
...perfect, could not have inferred from the fluidity and tranfparency of water,- that it would fufibcate him, or from the light and warmth of fire, that it would confume him. No object ever difcovers, by the qualities which appear to the fenfes, either the caufes,...
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The Criterion; Or Rules by which the True Miracles Recorded in the New ...

John Douglas - Bible - 1807 - 416 pages
...could not have " inferred, from the fluidity and tranfpa-i " rency of water, that it would fuffocate " him, or from the light and warmth of " fire, that it would confume him. No " objeft ever difcovers, by the qualities " which appear to the fenfes, either the...
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An inquiry concerning human understanding. A dissertation on the passions ...

David Hume - Philosophy - 1817
...its causes or effects, Adam, though his rational faculties be supposed, at the very first, entirely perfect, could not have inferred from the fluidity...discovers, by the qualities which appear to the senses, cither the causes which produced it, or the effects which will arise from it ; nor can our reason,...
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Essays and Treatises on Several Subjects ...

David Hume - 1825
...its causes or effects. Adam, though his rational faculties be supposed, at the very first, entirely perfect, could not have inferred from the fluidity and transparency of water, that it would sufibcate him; or from the light- and warmth of fire, that it would consume him. No object ever discovers,...
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The Methodist Review, Volume 6; Volume 36

Methodist Church - 1854
...of its causes or effects. Adam, though his rational faculties be supposed at the very first entirely perfect, could not have inferred from the fluidity...light and warmth of fire that it would consume him." All this we see no reason to dispute ; but when he advances to the conclusion that it is by repeated...
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The Elements of Logic: Adapted to the Capacity of Younger Students, and ...

Charles Kittredge True - Logic - 1860 - 176 pages
...of its causes or effects. Adam, though his rational faculties be supposed at the very first entirely perfect, could not have inferred from the fluidity...light and warmth of fire that it would consume him." All this we see no reason to dispute ; but when he advances to the conclusion that it is by repeated...
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Brownson's quarterly review

1874
...very first, entirely perfect, could not, from the fluidity and transparency of water, have inferred that it would suffocate him ; or, from the light and...of fire, that it would consume him. No object ever reveals, by the qualities which appear to the senses, either the causes which produced it, or the effects...
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Problems of life and mind

George Henry Lewes - 1875
...knowledge of effects or causes is due to experience ; the other, the extremely irrelevant assertion that " no object ever discovers by the qualities which appear...produced it or the effects which will arise from it," — in other words, no object, viewed in its present condition, is viewed in its past and future* condition...
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Text-book to Kant: The Critique of Pure Reason; Aesthetic, Categories ...

Immanuel Kant - Causation - 1881 - 548 pages
...impossible is it to find in any particular cause any particular quality by which it is the cause it is. ' No object ever discovers, by the qualities which appear...produced it, or the effects which will arise from it.' But if causality be not a quality, it can only be a relation. And this relation examined, we find all...
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The Works of Orestes A. Brownson: Philosophy

Orestes Augustus Brownson - Literature - 1882
...very first, entirely perfect, could not, from the fluidity and transparency of water, have inferred that it would suffocate him; or, from the light and...of fire, that it would consume him. No object ever reveals, by the qualities which appear to the senses, either the causes which produced it, or the effects...
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