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not fall into a sameness of idea, whose dead fly will mar the beauties of the Hypotyposis with the judicious. Ovid tells us, that at the deluge,

All things were sea :

A thought sublime in its own native simplicity; but how does the Poet wretchedly tautologize, when he immediately adds,

The fea too had no fhores *?

“ Lucan's description of the Po,says Mr ADDISON,“ would have been very beautiful, had “ he known where to have given over.

« The Po, that rushing with uncommon force, • O'ersets whole woods in its tumultuous course, « And, rising from Hesperia's watry veins, « Th' exhausted land of all its moisture drains. “ The Po, as fings the fable, first convey'd " Its wand'ring current thro' a poplar fhade ; « For when young PHAETON mistook his way, « Lost and confounded in the blaze of day, “ This river, with surviving streams supply'd, " When all the rest of the whole earth was dry’d, 6 And nature's self lay ready to expire, « Quench'd the dire flame that set the world on fire t.

" The

* Omnia pontus erant. Deérant quoque littora ponto.

Ovid. Metamorph. lib. i. ver. 292. + Quoque magis nullum tellus se solvit in amnem.

Eridanus, fractasque evolvit in æquora sylvas,
Hesperiamque exhaurit aquis : hunc fabula primum
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Populea

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TH directic

« The Poet's reflections follow, (1)

Vor would the Nile more watry stores contain, copies

" But that he stagnates on his Libyan plain ; notes

Nor would the Danube run with greater force, Job,

< But that he gathers in his tedious course

Ten thousand streams, and, swelling as he goes, «

- In Enkian leas the glut of rivers throws *.

That is, lays SCALIGER, the Po would be so

** bigger than the Nile and Danube, if the Nile

and Danule were not bigger than the Po. « What makes the Poet's remark the more im

the

very reafon why the Danube is than the Po, as he assigns it, is that Chich really makes the Po as great as it is ; et for

, before its fall into the gulph, it reaceives into its channel the most considerable ir rivers of Piedmont, Milan, and the rest of Lom

66

proper, greater

« bardy. t."

I will

Populea fluvium ripas umbraffe corona :
Cumque diem pronum tranfverfo limite ducens
Succendit Phaeton flagrantibus æthera loris ;
Gurgitibus raptis, penitus tellure perusta,
Hunc habuisse pares Phoebeis ignibus undas.

Lib.ii. ver. 408.
Non minor hic Nilo, si non per plana jacentis
Ægypti Libycas Nilus ftagnaret arenas.
Non minor hic Istro, nifi quod dum per permeat orbem
liter, casuros in quælibet æquora fontes
Accipit, & Scythiacas exit non folus in undas.

Ibid. ver. 416. +

Addison's Travels, p. 73. Ołtavo edition.

I will add another passage from the same ingenious Writer : “ Ovid, says he, seems parti

cularly pleased with the subject of this story cs (the story of Narcissus) but has notoriously « fallen into a fault he is often taxed with, of “ not knowing when he has said enough, by his “ endeavouring to excel: How has he turned “ and twisted that one thought of Narcissus's

being the person beloved, and the lover too! Cunetaque miratur quibus est mirabilis ipse.

Qui probat, ipse probatur. Dumque petit petitur, pariterque incendit, & ardet. « Ante oculos idem qui decipit incitat error. « Perque oculos perit ipfe fuos

Uxor amore mei, Aammas moveoque feroque, &c. *"

(3) In our descriptions, let us not be minute and particular in gathering up every circumstance, especially if our subject be great and solemn.' Of this fault the following lines may perhaps be justly accused, where Sir RICHARD BLACKMORE, in a description of hell, says,

In Aaming heaps the 'raging ocean rolls,
Whose livid waves involve despairing fouls;
The liquid burnings dreadful colours fhew,

Some deeply red, and others faintly blue t.
And who would have imagined, that in so great
an event as the conflagration of the world by
Phaeton's madness, and which Ovid so well

describes

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• Addison's Miscellanies, vol. i. page 250.
+ Prince ARTHUR, page 196.

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- The Poet's reflections follow,

« Nor would the Nile more watry stores contain, « But that he stagnates on his Libyan plain ; " Nor would the Danube run with greater force, “ But that he gathers in his tedious course " Ten thousand streams, and, swelling as he goes,

" In Scythian feas the glut of rivers throws *. " That is, says SCALIGER, the Po would be

bigger than the Nile and Danube, if the Nile “ and Danube were not bigger than the Po. " What makes the Poet's remark the more improper,

the very reafon why the Danube is greater than the Po, as he assigns it, is that “ which really makes the Po as great as it is ; “ for, before its fall into the gulph, it reu ceives into its channel the most considerable “ rivers of Piedmont, Milan, and the rest of Lombardy it.”

I will

Populea Auvium ripas umbraffe corona :
Cumque diem pronum tranfverfo limite ducens
Succendit Phaeton flagrantibus æthera loris ;
Gurgitibus raptis, penitus tellure perusta,
Hunc habuisse pares Phoebeis ignibus undas.

Lib. ii. ver. 408. * Non minor hic Nilo, fi non per plana jacentis

Ægypti Libycas Nilus ftagnaret arenas.
Non minor hic Istro, nifi quod dum per permeat orbem
Ifter, casuros in quælibet æquora fontes
Accipit, & Scythiacas exit non folus in undas.'

Ibid. ver. 416. + ADDIson's Travels, p. 73. Octavo edition.

I will add another passage from the same ingenious Writer : “ Ovid, says he, seems parti“ cularly pleased with the subject of this story “ (the story of Narcissus) but has notoriously « fallen into a fault he is often taxed with, of “ not knowing when he has said enough, by his “ endeavouring to excel: How has he turned " and twisted that one thought of Narcissus's “ being the person beloved; and the lover too! 56. Cunetaque miratur quibus eft mirabilis ipse.

Qui probat, ipfe probatur. “ Dumque petit petitur, pariterque incendit, & ardet. “ Ante oculos idem qui decipit incitat error. “ Perque oculos perit ipfe suos is Uxor amore mei, Aammas moveoque feroque, &c.

(3) In our descriptions, let us not be minute and particular in gathering up every circumstance, especially if our subject be great and solemn. Of this fault the following lines may perhaps be justly accused, where Sir RICHARD BLACKMORE, in a description of hell, says,

In Aaming heaps the 'raging ocean rolls,
Whose livid waves involve despairing fouls;
The liquid burnings dreadful colours Thew,

Some deeply red, and others faintly blue t.
And who would have imagined, that in so great
an event as the conflagration of the world by
PHAETON's madness, and which Ovid so well

Y 2

describes

• Addison's Miscellanies, vol. i. page 250. † Prince ARTHUR, page 196

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