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But should he hide his face, th' astonish'd sun,
And all th’extinguish'd stars, would loos’ning start
Wide from their spheres, and chaos come again.

Next follows an Apostrophe to Deity :

And yet was ev'ry fault'ring tongue of men,
ALMIGHTY MAKER! filent in thy praise ;
Thy works themselves would raise a gen’ral voice,
Evin in the depth of folitary woods,
By human foot untrod, proclaim thy pow'r,
And to the quire celestial thee resound,
Th'eternal caufe, support, and end of all !

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They are charming lines in Dr Watts's Elegy
on the Death of the Rev. Mr THOMAS GOUGE:
Howe * is a great, but single name;

Amidst the crowd he stands alone:
Stands yet, but with his starry pinions on,

Drest for the flight, and ready to be gone.

1

The next verses are an address to Deity, and no-
bly close the poem :

Eternal God, command his stay,
Stretch the dear months of his delay :
Owe could wish his age were one immortal day !

But when the flaming chariot 's come,

And shining guards t'attend thy prophet home,
Amidst a thousand weeping eyes,
Send an ELISHA down, a foul of equal fize,
Or burn this worthless globe, and take us to the skiest.

MILTON

The very great Mr John Howe, then living. + Watts's Lyric Poems, page 299.

of the passage may be, “ that if the heaven and « earth had intelligence and reason, they would “ certainly accuse the Israelites of their impiety, “ since they and all things in them punctually " answer the ends of their creation; while men, “ for whom they were made, dare to be delin

quents and apostates from their God.”

$ 4. This Figure is of admirable service to diversify, our discourses, as we direct ourselves to different objects from those we first addressed.

By this Figure, says Dr WARD*, the speaker “ has an opportunity of saying many things with

greater freedom than perhaps would be con. “sistent with decency, if immediately directed “ to persons, themselves ; he can admonish, " chide, and censure without giving offence.” Mr BLACKWALL also observes, that when the

passion is violent, it must break out and dis“ charge itself. By this Figure, the person “moved, says he, desires to interest universal “ nature in his cause; and appeals to all the “ creation for the justness of his transport f.”

I shall conclude with an excellent passage from LONGINUS, in which he descants on what he takes to be an Apostrophe.

« DEMOSTHENES,

says

cuncta elementa cognoscant juftè Dominum in ultionem mandatorum fuorum ad iracundiam concitatum. HIERONYM. in Comment. Esa, i. 2.

• WARD's Oratory, vol. ii. page 102.
+ BLACKWALL's Introduction to the Claffics, page 198.

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and verse 26. s I am distressed for thee, my bross ther JONATHAN.S

(3) Apostrophes are sometimes in Scripture addressed to brute creatures that are destitute of reason; Psalm cxlviii. 7---10. s Praise the LORD

from the earth, ye dragons, beasts, and all

cattle, and creeping things, and flying fowl.'s So Joel ii. 22. « Be not afraid, ye beasts of the

field, for the pastures of the wilderness do spring,s &c.

(4) We meet with Apostrophes in sacred Writ to inanimate and material beings : Jer. xxii. 29. ss o earth, earth, earth, hear the word of the ss Lord !ss So Micah vi. 7. s Hear, Oye mouns tains, the Lord's controverfy, and ye strong » foundations of the earth." So Ifa. i. 2. - Hear, ss o heavens, and give ear, earth, for the * LORD hath spoken: I have nourished and

brought up children, and they have rebelled against ine." Upon which passage St Jerom observes, that' “ as God had called heaven and " earth as his witnesses, when he gave his laws

by Moses to the Ifraelites, Deut. xxxii. 1. so, « after they had broken those laws, he sumınons “ them again to be his witnesses, that all the “ elements might know that God was justly

provoked to anger in taking vengeance for u the violation of his commands *." The fenfe

of

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* Quia per Moysen teftes vocaverat Dominus cælum & terram dans populo Israel legem suam, Deut. xxxii, I post præ. varicationem populi eosdem rursum in teftimonium vocat, ut

cuncta

of the passage may be, “ that if the heaven and “ earth had intelligence and reason, they would “ certainly accuse the Israelites of their impiety, “since they and all things in them punctually

answer the ends of their creation ; while men, “ for whom they were made, dare to be delin

quents and apostates from their God.”

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§ 4. This Figure is of admirable service to diversify our discourses, as we direct ourselves to different objects from those we first addressed. “. By this Figure, says Dr WARD*, the speaker “ has an opportunity of saying many things with

greater freedom than perhaps would be con. “ sistent with decency, if immediately directed “ to perfons, themselves, he can admonish, « chide, and censure without giving offence." Mr BLACKWALL also observes, that when the

passion is violent, it must break out and dis

charge itself. By this Figure, the person “ moved, says he, desires to interest universal “ nature in his cause ; and appeals to all the « creation for the justness of his transport fi

I shall conclude with an excellent passage from LONGINUs, in which he descants on what he takes to be an Apostrophe.

" DEMOSTHENES,

says cuncta elementa cognofcant justè Dominum in vltionem mandatorum fuorum ad iracundiam concitatum.

HIERONYM.it Comment. Efa. i. 2.

• Ward's Oratory, vol. ii. page 102.
+ BLACKWALL's Introduction to the Claffics, page 198.

“ says he, gives an account of the affairs of the

city. The natural method of doing this was s for him to have said, You have not been faulty « who have exposed yourselves for the liberty of “ Greece; you have examples from yourselves to

support you; nor were they faulty who fought « at Marathon, Salamis, and Platæd. But when, “ as if he had been instantaneously inspired and 6 possessed by Apollo, he thunders out an oath * by the champions of Greece, You have not been

faulty, no, you have not, I swear by the brave

fouls who facrificed their lives at Marathon, he ** seems by this figurative oath, which I call an * Apostrophe, to deify their ancestors, by thew

ing that they ought to swear by such who had tdied in defence of their country, as by lo “ many Gods; he insinuates at the same time to * the judges, the greatness of foul in those heit roes, who had expofed themselves to death in * To glorious a caufe; he soars beyond common * representation into fuperlative sublimity, pours « in a powerful pathos, excites that venerable

regard which is due to uncominon and to the x moft facred oaths, and at the same time admito nisters to the minds of his auditors such fenti< ment, as, like a medicinal balm, heals the « anguish of their spirits. The Orator animates

them with his praises, and teaches them to * think as highly of their defeat by PHILIP, as 66 of the victories of Marathon and Salamis : by o these means, in the strength of this Figure, « the Orator advances with success, and with a

“ sovereign

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