The North Briton, XLVI: Numbers Complete, Volume 4

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 174 - I consider myself already as a contracting party, and have recourse to the assistance of my allies. It is not, I believe, unknown to you that Admiral Knowles has taken exception at a paragraph in the Critical Review of last May, and commenced a prosecution against the printer.
Page 45 - It is a real satisfaction to me that his lordship is to be accompanied by a gentleman of colonel Berkeley's worth and honour. This will be delivered to you by my adjutant, who attends me to Bagshot. I shall not bring...
Page 259 - Chelsey, but now dwelling at Copenhagen, being there in company with you, said, I think you were none of the late king's judges, nor guilty of his death, meaning our king.
Page 49 - I was a wretch, who fought his life. I reminded him, that I came there on a point of honour, to give his...
Page 52 - His lordship paid me the highest encomiums on my courage, and said he would declare everywhere that I was the noblest fellow God had ever made. He then desired that we might now be good friends, and retire to the Inn to drink a bottle of claret together, which we did with great good humour and much laugh.
Page 192 - I have no reafonable hopes of recovery, the fwelling which began at my legs, being now got up to my belly and head. I am a trouble to all about me...
Page 48 - D ment he pleafed. We went directly, with my adjutant Mr. Harris. I found Lord Talbot in an agony of paffion. He faid, that I had injured, that I had infuked him, that he was not ufed to...
Page 49 - I did not mean to quit him, but would absolutely first settle some important business relative to the education of an only daughter, whom I tenderly loved, that it would take up...
Page 201 - OU will excufe the trouble I give you, becaufe it is on an affair of infinite concern to my character, and I think you have it in your power to do me juftice. A report has been fet about, that I am the author of the Obfervations on the SPANISH PAPERS, which, if it gains credit, will be as prejudicial to my intereft, as it is abfolutely unfupported by truth. You may pleafe to...
Page 139 - And strictly weighs, in apprehension clear, Things as they are, and not as they appear. With thee good-humour tempers lively wit ; Enthron'd with judgment, candour loves to sit, And nature gave thee, open to distress, A heart to pity, and a hand to bless.

Bibliographic information