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judged, from the success with which, under the blessing of God, their efforts have been attended. A few plain facts will, here, speak more than volumes of general panegyric. Of those who left this Asylum, in the course of eight years, fifty-three young women were placed in respectable services; and sixty-five young men completed their apprenticeships, and were qualified to earn an income fully sufficient for their creditable support. Thirty of these young men, previous to being admitted into this Establishment, had been personally engaged in criminal practices; and the remaining thirty-five were the children of convicts. Every apprentice has a weekly task assigned him, of an amount equal to two thirds of the sum which he can industriously earn.. If he performs more than his task, he is allowed one half of his extra earnings: not, however, immediately; for this might prove injurious. One third of the amount is paid him weekly: the remainder is accumulated, and paid to him at the end of his apprenticeship; together with some additional rewards for good conduct. Of the sixty-five young men already mentioned, forty-three quitted the Institution, with a sum not exceeding 201.; eighteen with from 201. to 301.; some, with from 301. to 401. The females, also, have received rewards, proportioned to the length of time they remained in

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service. Thus, while habits of industry have been formed, the benefits of industry have been felt; the young persons have been supplied with a competent outfit, on their entrance into life ; and there is good reason to feel satisfied, that the habits acquired will not be relinquished ; and that the benefits obtained, will be converted into yet more solid blessings.

It is, indeed, an ascertained fact, that numbers of the persons of both sexes trained in this Asylum, are creditably and comfortably established in life. Several, have occasionally called at this Institution, to express their gratitude, for the benefits here received; and still more would follow their example, were it not for the supposed discredit, which might attach to the recollection of their earliest years, and their original unhappy condition. But it is a most gratifying circumstance, that many who were educated here, attend Divine service in this Chapel, and rejoice in contributing their mite, towards the support of an Institution, to which, under the providence and grace of God, they are indebted for every comfort of this life, and every hope and anticipation of a better. This one fact shows, that they are, not only carefully, but affectionately trained; that, not only, their minds have been disciplined, but their hearts have been won.

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One word only, I will add; the multitudes received within these walls, might have been the pests of society; they are likely to become its blessings. They might have engaged others in a course of wickedness; they are likely to enlist others in an active course of goodness. They might have continued children of the wicked one; they are, we trust, the children of God, and candidates for happiness and heaven. May the Giver of all good gifts put it into your hearts, to be bountiful this day; may your contributions redound to his glory, and to the salvation of souls; and, when the secrets of all hearts shall be disclosed, may you enjoy the happiness of knowing, that, by your distribution of this world's goods, you have been instrumental, towards augmenting the number of blessed and immortal spirits!

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DISCOURSE XII.

DANIEL xii. 2, 3.

AND MANY OF THEM THAT SLEEP IN THE DUST OF THE

EARTH SHALL AWAKE; SOME TO EVERLASTING LIFE; AND SOME TO SHAME AND EVERLASTING CONTEMPT ; AND THEY THAT BE WISE, SHALL SHINE AS THE BRIGHTNESS OF THE FIRMAMENT; AND THEY THAT TURN MANY TO RIGHTEOUSNESS, AS THE STARS FOR EVER AND EVER.

In all human pursuits, the first question that we naturally ask ourselves is, . What will be the end ? (1) In business or pleasure; in active or contemplative life; in schemes of self-advancement, or in efforts to promote the happiness of others, — some distant eminence is seen in bright perspective, which we regard as the crown and consummation of our wishes. These final results are the grand movers of life; the mainsprings of all social, intellectual, and moral activity. First in conception, and last in attainVOL. I.

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ment, they are habitually kept in view, till the moment of completion. In every stage of the most lengthened process, they impel us to renewed exertion. In every pause of our wearied spirits, they urge us to encounter difficulties, surmount obstacles, endure hardships, each in our several spheres and degrees, but all with a similarity of reference to some future period, when toil shall cease, and when hope shall be lost in the fulness of enjoyment.

This is the universal habit of our nature. Every being who can think and act, has an end in view, which shapes the course of his life, and modifies the character of his mind. (2) The objects thus pursued, are indeed, infinitely various. The creature of vulgar instinct, never looks beyond the minute and visionary shadows of this present world: the man of moral prudence, has an easy standard of social virtue and enjoyment; but the Christian, feels that he is living for eternity, and, therefore, can repose on nothing less immutable, than the Alpha and Omega, the first and the last, the original and end of all things. (3) This is the supreme object; this alone, is worthy to occupy and fill the soul of an immortal being ; this alone, can serve as an unerring pole-star, to guide us through the waves of a troublesome world; this alone, can lead us to the attainment

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