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" The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline... "
The Christian Observer - Page 253
1815
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 36

1834
...it; and Spenser — who was a gentleman too — not merely of the king's but of God's creating — tells us that " the general end of all the Booke is...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." Perhaps — though we hope not — you may have read Lord Chesterfield. It was the " general end" of...
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The British Poets: Including Translations ...

British poets - English poetry - 1822
...expressing of any particular purposes, or by-accidents, therein occasioned. The general end therefore of all the Booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline : which for that I conceiued shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historical...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 36

Scotland - 1834
...and Spenser — who was a gentleman too — not merely of the king's • but of God's creating — tells us that " the general end of all the Booke is...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." Perhaps — though we hope jiot — you may have read Lord Chesterfield. It was the " general end"...
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The New-York Review, Volume 4

1839
...Spenser sent forth his immortal allegory, his high aim appears from the explanatory letter to Raleigh, that " the general end of all the Booke is to fashion...noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline,*' and thus he " moralized in song." In all his laments too — heart-broken as he probably was — is...
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The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 1

Edmund Spenser, Philip Masterman - 1839
...expressing of any particular purposes, or by-accidents, therein occasioned. The general end therefore of all the Booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline: which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historical...
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The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 1

George Stillman Hillard - English poetry - 1839
...particular purposes, or by-accidents, therein occasioned. The general end therefore of all the Booko is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline : which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historical...
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The North American Review, Volume 50

Jared Sparks, Edward Everett, James Russell Lowell, Henry Cabot Lodge - North American review and miscellaneous journal - 1840
...Works. [Jan. and on this model he fashioned his hero. He observes, that " the general end, therefore, of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in gentle and virtuous discipline." And again ; " I labor to pourtraict in Arthure, before he was king,...
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Lives of illustrious ... Irishmen, ed. by J. Wills

Irishman - 1840
...particular purposes or by-accidents therein occasioned. The general end therefore of all the book, is to fashion a gentleman or noble person, in vertuous and gentle discipline;—which for that I conceived should be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with...
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The New-York Review, Volume 8

1841
...accomplishments, in elegance, and in manly virtues, from the reality. His object, as he has himself told us, was, to " fashion a gentleman, or noble person, in vertuous and gentle discipline;" and again, "Ilaoour to pourtraict in Arthure, before he was king, the image of a brave knight, perfected...
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The faerie queene

1843
...expressing of any particular purposes, or by-accidents, therein occasioned. The general end, therefore, of all the booke, is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuoue and gentle discipline ; which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing,...
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