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upon you: but tarry ye in the city of Jerusalem, until ye be endued with power from on high.

The promise which the Father had made to them through the Saviour. See Matt. x. 19; John xiv. 16, 17, 26. The promise was, that they should be aided by the power of the Holy Ghost. See Joel ii. 28, 29, compared with Acts ii. 16-21. Endued

with power from on high.' The power which would be given them by the descent of the Holy Ghost. The power of speaking with tongues, of working miracles, and of preaching the gospel with the attending blessing and aid of the Holy Spirit. See Acts ii.

50 And he led them out as far as to Bethany, and he lifted up his hands, and blessed them. 51 And it came to pass, while he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven.

'To Bethany. See the note on Mark xvi. 19. Bethany was on the eastern declivity of the mount of Olives, from which our Lord ascended to heaven, Acts i. 12. While he blessed them.' While he commanded his benediction to rest upon them; while he assured them of his favour, and commended them to the protection and guidance of God.

52 And they worshipped him, and returned to Jerusalem with great joy:

'They worshipped him.' The word 'worship,' does not always denote religious homage. But here it is to be remarked, 1. That they offered this worship to an absent Saviour. It was after he left them, and had vanished out of their sight. It was, therefore, an act of religion, and was the first religious homage that was paid to Jesus after he left the world. 2. If they worshipped an absent Saviour-a Saviour unseen by the bodily eye-it is right for us to do it. It was an example which we may and should follow. 3. If worship may be rendered to Jesus, he is Divine.

53 And were continually in the temple, praising and blessing God. Amen.

'Were continually in the temple.' Until the day of Pentecost; that is, about ten days after. See Acts ii. 'Praising and blessing God.' Chiefly for the full proof that the Messiah had come, had redeemed them, and had ascended to heaven. "Thus the days of their mourning were ended." They were filled with joy at the assurance of redemption, and poured forth, in the sanctuary, prayers and thanksgivings to the God of grace for his mercy to a lost and ruined world.

THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO JOHN.

PREFACE.

JOHN, the writer of this gospel, was the son of Zebedee and Salome, Matt. xxvii. 56. Compare Mark xv. 40, 41. His father was a fisherman of Galilee, though it would appear that he was not destitute of property, and was not in the lowest condition of life. He had hired men in his employ, Mark i. 20. Salome is described as one who attended our Saviour in his travels, and ministered to his wants, Matt. xxvii. 55; Mark xv. 41.

John was the youngest of the apostles when called, and lived to the greatest age, and is the only one who is supposed to have died a peaceful death. He was called to be a follower of Jesus while engaged with his father and his elder brother James, mending their nets at the sea of Tiberias, Matt. iv. 21; Mark i. 19; Luke v. 10.

The two brothers, James and John, with Peter, were several times admitted to peculiar favour by our Lord. They were the only disciples that were allowed to be present at the raising of the daughter of Jairus, Mark v. 37; Luke viii. 51; they only were permitted to attend our Saviour to the mount where he was transfigured, Matt. xvii. 1; Mark ix. 2. The same three were present at his sufferings in the garden of Gethsemane, Matt. xxvi. 36-45; Mark xiv. 32-42. And it was to these disciples, together with Andrew, that our Saviour especially addressed himself when he made known the desolations that were coming upon Jerusalem and Judea. Compare Matt. xxiv. 1-3; Mark xiii. 1-3. John was also admitted to peculiar friendship with the Lord Jesus. Hence he is mentioned as "that disciple whom Jesus loved," John xix. 26; and he is represented, John xiii. 23, as leaning on Jesus' bosom at the institution of the Lord's supper.

To John was committed the care of Mary, the mother of Jesus. After the ascension of Christ he remained some time at Jerusalem, Acts i. 14; iii. 1; iv. 13. John is also mentioned as having been sent down to Samaria to preach the gospel there with Peter, Acts viii. 14-25; and from Acts xv. it appears that he was present at the council of Jerusalem, A.D. 49 or 50. All this agrees with what is said by Eusebius, that he lived at Jerusalem till the death of Mary, fifteen years after the crucifixion of Christ.

Ecclesiastical history informs us that he spent the latter part of his life in Asia Minor, and that he resided chiefly in Ephesus, the chief city of that country. In the latter part of his life he was banished to Patmos, a small desolate island in the Ægean sea. This is supposed to have been during the persecution of

Domitian, in the latter part of his reign. Domitian died A.D. 96. In that island he wrote the book of Revelation, Rev. i. 9. After his return from Patmos, he lived peaceably at Ephesus until his death, which is supposed to have occurred not long after. He was buried at Ephesus; and it has been thought that he was the only one of the apostles who did not suffer martyrdom. It is evident that he lived to a very advanced period of life. We know not his age, indeed, when Christ called him to follow him; but we cannot suppose it was less than twenty-five or thirty. If so, he must have been about one hundred years old when he died.

Learned men have been much divided about the time when this Gospel was written. The common opinion is, that it was written at Ephesus, after his return from Patmos, and of course as late as the year 97, or 98. There is no doubt that it was written by John. This is abundantly confirmed by the ancient fathers, and was not questioned by Celsus, Porphyry, or Julian, the acutest enemies of revelation in the early ages.

John himself states the design of writing it, ch. xx. 31. It was to show that Jesus was the Christ, the Son of God, and that those who believed might have life through his name. This design is kept in view through the whole Gospel, and should be remembered in our attempts to explain it.

As he wrote after the other evangelists, he has recorded many things which they omitted. He dwells much more fully than they do on the Divine character of Jesus, relates many things pertaining to the early part of his ministry which they had omitted, records many more of his discourses than they had passed over, and particularly the interesting discourse at the institution of the last supper. See ch. xiv. xv. xvi. xvii.

It has been remarked that there are evidences in this Gospel that it was not written for the Jews. John explains words and customs which to a Jew would have needed no explanation. See ch. i. 38, 41; v. 1, 2; vii. 2; iv. 9. The style indicates that he was an unlearned man. It is simple, plain, unpolished; such as we should suppose would be used by one in his circumstances. At the same time it contains pure and profound sentiments, and is on many accounts the most difficult of all the books of the New Testament to interpret. It contains more about Christ, his person, design, and work, than any of the other Gospels. The other evangelists were employed more in recording the miracles, and giving external evidence of the Divine mission of Jesus. John tells us what Christ was, and what was his peculiar doctrine. The other evangelists record his parables, his miracles, his debates with the scribes and pharisees; John records chiefly his discourses about himself. If any one wishes to learn the true doctrine respecting the Messiah, the Son of God, expressed in simple language, but with most sublime conceptions; or to learn the

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45 Then opened he th might understand the ser 'Opened their understan comprehend the meaning of the and resurrection. They had risen. Their prejudices were by the facts which they could no more doubted that he was seeing so many mysteries in preconceived opinions. If a declarations of the Bible, he w teries. God only can open the the scriptures. He only can hearts, and dispose us to recei ness, and with the simplicity of i. 21; Mark x. 15.

46 And said unto them, it behoved Christ to suffer the third day:

'It behoved.' It became; it Messiah should thus suffer.

47 And that repentance be preached in his name a at Jerusalem.

'Repentance.' Sorrow for xvii. 30. Remission of sins 'In my name.' By my comm men should repent, and by Pardon is offered by the aut this is a sufficient warrant 'Beginning at Jerusalem.' derers, and it shows his read It was the holy place of the place of the solemnities of th Messiah came, and it was pro claimed there. This was do there. See Acts ii.

48 And ye are witnes 'Witnesses of these thing death, and my resurrection. witnesses for Christ; they a his love; and they should brought to see and love the

49 And, behold, I

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Domitian, in the latter part of his reign. Domitian died A.D. 96. that island he wrote the book of Revelation, Rev. i. 9. After return from Patmos, he lived peaceably at Ephesus until his ath, which is supposed to have occurred not long after. He s buried at Ephesus; and it has been thought that he was the ly one of the apostles who did not suffer martyrdom. It is dent that he lived to a very advanced period of life. We know this age, indeed, when Christ called him to follow him; but cannot suppose it was less than twenty-five or thirty. If so, must have been about one hundred years old when he died. Learned men have been much divided about the time when

s Gospel was written. The common opinion is, that it as written at Ephesus, after his return from Patmos, and of rse as late as the year 97, or 98. There is no doubt t it was written by John. This is abundantly confirmed the ancient fathers, and was not questioned by Celsus, phyry, or Julian, the acutest enemies of revelation in the

y ages.

ohn himself states the design of writing it, ch. xx. 31. It
to show that Jesus was the Christ, the Son of God, and that
e who believed might have life through his name. This de-
is kept in view through the whole Gospel, and should be
embered in our attempts to explain it.
As he wrote after the other evangelists, he has recorded many
gs which they omitted. He dwells much more fully than
do on the Divine character of Jesus, relates many things
aining to the early part of his ministry which they had omitted,
rds many more of his discourses than they had passed over,
particularly the interesting discourse at the institution of the
supper. See ch. xiv. xv. xvi. xvii.

It has been remarked that there are evidences in this Gospel et it was not written for the Jews. John explains words and stoms which to a Jew would have needed no explanation. See . i. 38, 41; v. 1, 2; vii. 2; iv. 9. The style indicates that he as an unlearned man. It is simple, plain, unpolished; such as we should suppose would be used by one in his circumstances. At the same time it contains pure and profound sentiments, and on many accounts the most difficult of all the books of the New estament to interpret. It contains more about Christ, his peron, design, and work, than any of the other Gospels. The other evangelists were employed more in recording the miracles, and riving external evidence of the Divine mission of Jesus. John tells us what Christ was, and what was his peculiar doctrine. The ther evangelists record his parables, his miracles, his debates with the scribes and pharisees; John records chiefly his disourses about himself. If any one wishes to learn the true docrine respecting the Messiah, the Son of God, expressed in simple language, but with most sublime conceptions; or to learn the

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