Hill of Grace

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Wakefield Press, 2004 - Fiction - 341 pages
In the rambling countryside of Australia's Barossa Valley in 1951, old-school Lutheran William Miller is living with a shocking secret. His intense Bible studies have revealed to him what no other scholars have been able to discover—the exact date of the Apocalypse. Armed with the secret of the prophecy, a group of followers join William to help deliver the news and prepare for the end. Yet as the seasons pass in the valley and the final day approaches, the faith of the locals is put to the test. Was it truly the voice of God that spoke to William on the Hill of Grace or is he simply deluded? This thought-provoking novel is inspired by the true story of one of the founders of the Seventh Day Adventist movement.

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
19
Section 3
30
Section 4
41
Section 5
55
Section 6
71
Section 7
92
Section 8
114
Section 13
222
Section 14
237
Section 15
253
Section 16
273
Section 17
319
Section 18
335
Section 19
Section 20

Section 9
127
Section 10
153
Section 11
185
Section 12
203
Section 21
Section 22
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Stephen Orr is an author whose career began as a runner-up in the 2002 Vogel/Australian award. Attempts to Draw Jesus was published by Allen and Unwin in 2002. Since then he has written several other novels, been long- and shortlisted for awards such as the Commonwealth Writers┐ Prize and the Miles Franklin, and worked as a journalist and teacher. His latest novel, One Boy Missing, was his first venture into literary crime writing.

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