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THE

FIFTH BOOK

OF

PARADISE LOST.

The ARGUMENT.

T

HE Morning approaching Eve relates to Adam ber troublesome Dream; he does not like it, yet comforts ber; they

come forth to their Day-Labour : Their Morning Hymn at the Door of the Bower. God to render Man inexcufable, sends Raphael to admonish him of bis Obedience, of his free Esiate, of bis Enemy near at Hand; who he is; and why his Enemy, and whatever else may avail Adam to know. Raphael.comes down to Paradise ; his Appearance described, his Coming discerned by Adam afar of sitting at the Door of his Bower; he goe's out to meet him, brings kim to his Lodge, entertains bim with the choices Fruits of Paradise got together by Eve; their Discourse at Table : Raphael performs his Message, and puts Adam in u.ind of

bis State, and of bis Enemy. Raphael at the Ribuelt of Adam, relates who bis great Enemy is, and how he came to be so, beginning from his first Revolt in Heaven, and the Occafion tbercof; bow be drew his Legions after him to the Parts of the North, and therein incited them to rebel with bim ; persuading all, but only Abdiel, a Seraph, who in Argument dissuades and opposes kim, then forsakes bim.

CHAP. I. Eve relates to Adam her Dream; they come fortb

to their Day-Labour : Their Morning Hymn.

O W the Morning advancing with red Streaks in the Eaft, covered the Earth with shining Drops of Dew, when Adam awaked, being

so accustomed; for his Sleep was light, bred from pure Digestion and temperate pleasing Fumes, which the bare Sound of Leaves, and running Streams and the shrill Morning Song of Birds on every Bough lightly dispersed: His Wonder was so much the more to find Eve not yet awake; her Hair discomposed and her Cheeks glowing, as through unquiet Sleep: He on his Side half-raised and leaning, hung over her enamoured with Looks of Cordial Love, and beheld Beauty, which either asleep or awake caft forth peculiar Graces : Then wich Voice as mild as when the gentlest Winds breathe on the Flowers, softły touching her Hand, whispered thus: Awake, my Fairest! my Spouse! my lait-found Good! Heaven's Jaft, best Gift! My ever-new Delight! Awake! for now the Morning Thies, and the fresh Field calls for us; we loose the Prime to observe how our tender Plants

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Noah's first facrifice to GOD after his
Departure from the ark.

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spring, how the Citron Grove blows, what the Balmtree and the Myrrh drop, how Nature paints her Colour, and how the Bee fits upon the Flowers extracting Honey. Such whispering awaked her; but with startled Eyes, turned upon ADAM; to whom (embracing him) she spoke thus :

O Thou! in whom alone my Thoughts find any Repofe, my Perfection and my Glory! Gladly I see thy Face and the Morning returned; for I this Night have dreamed, (if indeed it was a Dream, for such a Night till this I never pafled before) not as I am often used about thee, the work of the passed Day, or that next designed for the Morrow; but I have dreamed of Offence and Trouble, which till this irksome Night my Mind never knew. Methought that one clote at my Ear with a gentle Voice called me to walk, I thought it was thine : It said, Eve, why doft thou sleep? Now is the pleasant, cool and filent Time, only where Silence yields to the Nightingale, that now awake tunes in the sweetest Notes, his lovelaboured Song: Now the full Moon reigns, and with a pleasanter Light sets off the Face of Things, but all in vain if none regard it : Heaven wakes with all his Eyes, and who is it to behold but thee, who art the Desire of Nature ? in whose Sight all Things have Joy, attracted by thy Beauty, still to gaze with Ravishment. I arole thinking it to be thy Call, but could not find thee, to which End I then directed my Walk; and alone, methought, I passed on through Ways that brought me on a sudden to the forbidden Tree of Knowledge. It seemed very fair, much fairer to my Fancy than it did by Day; and as I looked on it with Wonder, there stood by the Side of it, one shaped and winged, like those that come from Heaven, which we often see, his dewy Locks dropped Sweetness; and he also gazed on that Tree : Ando fair Plant, faid he, overcharged with Fruit ! Does no

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