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CHA P. III. Satan lights upon the bare Convex of the World's

uttermost Orb, where he first finds a Place, since called the Limbo of Vanity.

EAN while S AT AN lighted and walked upon that firmi opacous Globe of this round

Worldl, whose first Convex divides the inferior Orbs that are under it, and encloses them from Chaos and Night: Afar off it seemed a Globe, bus. now a boundless Continent, dark, waste, and wild, under the Darkness of Night, exposed, starless, with Storms of Chaos always blustering round it, and an inclement Sky; excepting on that Side, which though at great Distance from the Walls of Heaven, gains some small Reflexion of glimmering Air, less vexed with loud Tempest; here the Fiend walked at large; as when a VULTURE (i) upon the Mountain IMAUS (k), (whose snowy Ridge bounds in the roving Inhabitants of TARTARY (?) having left a Country where there

was

(i) Vulture; Lat. i.e, of a Mountain in Afia; a part of piercing Sharp Sight. A very vo Mount Taurus, - rifing from it Tacious Bird, bigger than an near the Caspian Sea ; and exEagle, of an excellent Sagacity tending to the Spring of the of Sight and Smelling above all Ganges. It parts Tartary from other Birds ; so that it can per Indin, dividing it into two parts, ceive the Savour of dead Car i. e. Tartary within, and Tartary cases fifty Miles off; and appear

without the imaus. Now Da. two or three Days before any linguer. great Slaughter. They feed only (!) Tartary ; Syr. i. e. Dark, upon Carcases, but prey not a Remnant; because they are upon any living Creatures.

thought to be the Remainder of (4) Imaus ; Lat. Gr. Tat. con the Ten Tribes of Israel. Tartračied from Mus Tag, i. e. The tary is a very large Country Mountain of Snow, as the Tar berween Muscovy and India, a. tars call it ; being always co bout 3000 Miles in Length, and vered therewith. * A valt high 2250 Miles ins Breadth; the

was Scarcity of Prey, with Intent to devour the Flesh of Lambs and young Kids, flies towards the Springs of GANGES (m), or HYDASPES (n), (which are Ri. vers of India) but in his Way lights on the barren Plains of SERICANA (0) where the CHINESE (P)

drive

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third Part of Afia. The Row be useful to them when dead. mans called it Scythia, i. e. The Great Mogul and all others Wrathful and furious ; or Teur. drink the Waters of it ; for it is Schieten, i. e. Shooting ; because carried far and near, and sold at the Scythians were excellent a dear Price, because they fool. Shooters or Marks-men. The ishly fancy that it springs from Perfians and Chinese call it Ta Paradise. It rises on Mount la laria and Tata, j. e. Invaders

in Tatary, divides the and Robbers, from Tatar, the whole Empire into two parts af: eldeft Son of Alanza-Chan, who ter a course of three hundred Gere was their Founder. The Tartars man Miles, or one thousand threebecame better known in Europe hundred Englis, discharges itself about A. D. 1168, when they into the Bay of Bengal in five subdued 'Part of Mufcozy, and chief Mouths. In some Places it became Masters of China; though is five Leagues over: There are it is not thoroughly known to many large Islands in it beset with this Day. The Epithet Roving fine Trees, which give a delightis very proper ; because they ful Prospect. It overflows at the wander about in Companies, in

usual Time of the Year, as the Tents, feeding their Cattle, with. Nile, Niger, Euphrates, &c. from out any fixed Houses, or Habi. the same. Cause. Now called tations. See, the Genealogical Ganga, by the Inhabitants there, History of the Tartars, translated (m) Hidapes; Ind, from a from the Tarar Manuscript, King of that Name. Another A.D. 1730.

famous River of India, which (m) Ganges; Ind.' i. e. - The runs by Nyfa, Lahar, and other River, or from a King of that great Cities, into the Indiani 0. Name. A famous River of In. dia, larger than any in Europe, (0) Sericana ; Arab. i. e. The except the Volga and Danube, Country of Seres ; the Posterity especially when it overflows; but of Joktan, who from Arabia Roted for the Goodness and Felix peopled that Part of In. Lightness of its Water. The dia, between Indus and Hydafpes, Indians say, it sanctifies them near to China, now called Ca. when they drink or wach them- thay; Tar. i. e. A great Eaftern selves in it. Four or Five Hun. Country. Those ancient People dred Thousand of them are seen wcreche Inventors and first Work. about it, throwing Money into ers of Silk, from whence it is ils &c. which they think may called Sericum. This and Chine

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drive their lightcany Waggons with Wind and Sails: So the Fierid walk'd up and down, alone, upon this new Region, bent on his Prey; alone indeed, for in the Place where he now was, no other Creature might be found, living or dead: none as yet, but ateerwards Hke airy Vapours flew up from the Earth grcat Store of all transitory and vain Things, when Sin had filled the Works" of Men with Vanity, and not only all vain Things, but all who in vain Things built their fond Hopes of Glory, or lasting Eame, of their Happiness, either in this or the other Life; all who have their Reward upon Earth, who go about only seeking to gain the Praise of Men, the Fruits of painful Supierftition and blind Zeal ; such find here a fit Retribution, as empty as their own Deeds: AH the unfinifhed

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China,

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was called, the Silken Kingdom ; rors above four.thousand, Years, for in one Province of China (as till the Tatars expelled the lait Le Comte fays) there seems to be Emperor, called Factius' or FaSilk, sufficient for all the World. chir; A. D. 1278, and was not Şee Pag. 438. Obs. Silk was known to the Europeans till the known in Europe. fort in Julia cwelfth Century. It is about njar's Time, about the Middle one thousand eight hundred of the fifth Century, by two Monks Miles in Length, one thousand who came from India,

two hundred Miles in Breadth, st) Chinese , the People of and consists of fixteen Provinces,

ancient Hebrews möll of which are as large, as called it Sin; the Moderns, Zin; any Kingdom in Europe. The the Arabs, Elin : the Persians. People, for their Numbers, Learn: and Jatars, lfthin; and the ing, Laws, Cuftoms, c. difEwropeans, Sinarum Regio, and fer from all others, because they China, from the Sind, from one had no Conversation with any. of its antient Monarchs, Cina or They are very cunning, cônceitChina;

or from Chung ii, e. The ed, industrious, almost all Pagan's Kingdom of the Middle. Because and Grand Cheats. The Chinese the Chinese think it lies in the have above fixty-thousand Lei. Middle of the Earth : Or, an ters, yet not above three-hunExcellent Country i Or, from dred Words, and write from the Sem, whose Pofterity they are. Top to the Bottom of the Page. China is a moft antient and large Their Country is so plain, that Empire in the East of Afia: It in many Places of it, they drive was

founded soon after the Flood, Waggons made of a sort of and governed by its own Empe. Cane, with Sails and Winds.

Works

Works of Nature, all that are abortive, monstrous, or not mixed according to Kind, being diffolved upon Earth fly hither, and wander vainly here 'till final Difa solution; not in the neighbouring Moon, as ARIOSTO and some others have dreamed, (that bright Planet may more likely be supposed to be inhabited by tranNated Saints, or Spirits of a middle Nature, betwixt the angelical and human Kind) hither, to this Limbo of VANITY, came first those Giants, who were born when the Sons of God joined themselves ill to the Daughters of those who were not of God: The next who came were the Builders of Babel upon the Plain of SHINAR (1), who still had they wherewithal would build new Babels: Others came single, EMPEDOCLES (r), who, that he might be thought a God, fondly leaped into the Flames of the burning Mount ÆTNA; and CLEOMEROTUS (s), who leaped into the

Sea,

() Shinar; Heb i. e. Scat. wrote a Book of Natural Philo. tering ; Because the People were fophy in Herioc Verse, and is - scattered over all the Earth : Or, supposed to be the first that had ftriking out of a Tooch, from any Knowledge of Rhetoric. the Confusion of all Languages, To be honoured as a God after Gen. x. 10. A Part of Chal. Death, he stole from his Comdea, where Nimrod built his pany by Night, and threw himTower. For Countries were cal. self into the Mouch of Mount Jed from the Captains of those Ærna, as if he had been tranthat first settled in them : But slated into Heaven : But the this is so called, to keep up the Flames threw up his Brazen SanMemory of that sad Accident to dals, and foon betrayed his future Ages.

Ambition. See Horat. de Arte (r) Empedocles; Lat. from the Poet. But others fay, 'that he Gr. i. c. Stable in Glory: A fell into the Sea, and vain-glorious Philosopher, Hi drowned. ftorian and Poet ; and Disciple (s) Cleombrotus ; Lat. Gr. i. e. of Pythagoras ; born at Agri. 'The Glory of Mortals. A foolith gentum in Sicily, the Son of Me young Greek of Ambracia, a 69, who once refused a King. City of Epirus, who was fo dom. He flourished in the eigh much taken with Plato's Bock ty-fourth Olympiad, A.M. 3558, of the Immortality of the Soul, and before Jesus Chrijl 468. He that he leaped headlong from a

Wall

was

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Sea, to enjoy the Elysium of PLATO (t); and many more too tedious to mention; Embrio's, Idiots, and Hermits (-u); Fryars, white, black, and grey, 'with all their foolish Trumpery: Hither Pu.GRIMS: (*) roam, that have wandered so far, to feek him dead in

2 Wall into the Sea, the fooner to was a notable Rhetorician, Chief be a Partaker of she Bliss in Ely. of the Academics, and produced fium, Cicero, Two of that Name many eminent Scholars : Nay, were Kings of Sparta, long be the PrimitiveChriftians embraced fore this Man.

his System of Philosophy, as far (1) Plato; Lat. from the Gr. nearer to the Holy Scriptores, i. e. Broad; Because he was than that of the Epicureaus. Stoics hunch-backed and broad in his and Peripatetics. He has left Forehead. His first Name was many Books, which are written Ariftocles, Gr. i. e. The best Glow in the form of Dialogues, exry; for the Name of his Grand cept only bis Epifles. Quintili. father ; but he retained the lat. an says, that he seems not to ter. A famous Philosopher, born speak the Language of Men, at Albens in the first Year of the but of the Gods. eighty-eighth Olympiad, A. M. (4) Hermits ; Gr. i. e. Devel3576, before Jesus Chrif four lers in the Wilderness. At first, hundred and eighty-two, and Holy Men for the Sake of Chrift died in the firft Year of the eigh. and their Lives, in hot Persecu. ty-eighth Olympiad, before Jejus tions, hid themselves in Delares, Christ three-hundred and forty Dens and Caves; and gave themeight, Aged eighty-one, and felves wholly to Fafting, Prayer upon the lame Day he was born. and great Austerities, Paul the Being an Infant, and deeping Theban, about A. D. 260, lived one Day under a Myrtle-Tree, about one-hundred Years in a a Swarm of Bees settled upon Cave: Anthony inftituted the Hero his Lips, which was taken for mitical Life in Egypt, and died an Omen, that he should be A. D. 361. But the Church of very eloquent, which hap. Rome hath made many Innova. pened to be true; and there. tions therein since. fore he was called the Albenian

(*) Pilgrims; Fr. from the Bee, for the Sweetness of his Lat. i. e. Strangers ; Men that Style. By his Travels into E travelled chrough foreign Coungypt, Chaldea, India, and read- tries, to pay their Devotions co ing the Books of Moses and the Saints departed, Shrines, Relicks. Prophets, he attained the Know The Christian Pilgrims went to ledge of God, Religion, and Jerufalem, Rome, St. lago, &c. Nature , therefore he is called and the Turkish to Mecca in Ara. the Divine Plato. He was Scho bia, every Year in solemn Prolar to Socrates Euclid, and the cefsions, to visit the Tomb of beft Masters of the Age. He Mubummed.

GOLGO.

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