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THE LAMBETH ARTICLES. A.D. 1595.

(The Lambeth Articles are a Calvinistic Appendix to the Thirty-nine Articles. They were composed by Dr. Whitaker, Regius Professor of Divinity at Cambridge, whose original draft (Hardwick, pp. 344 347) was still more ad mentem Calvini,' in opposition to the nine propositions of Barret (see Strype's Whitgift, Vol. III. p. 320). They were formally approved by the Archbishop of Canterbury (Dr. Whitgift), the Archbishop of York (Dr. Matthew Hutton, who indorsed the first article with 'verissimum,' and approved the rest), and a number of prelates convened at Lambeth Palace, London, Nov. 20, 1595, but not sanctioned by Queen Elizabeth (who was rather displeased with the convening of a synod without her royal permission), and met with considerable opposition. They were accepted by the Dublin Convocation of 1615, and engrafted on the Irish Articles. During the Arminian reaction under the Stuarts they lost their authority.

The Latin text is taken from Strype's Life and Acts of John Whitgift, Vol. II. p. 280 (Oxford edition, 1822). Strype copied it from the authentic MS. of the Lord Treasurer (probably presented to him by Dr. Whitaker).

The English text is from Thomas Fuller's Church History of Britain, Vol. III. p. 147 (London edition of 1837, or Vol. V. p. 220 of the Oxford University Press ed. 1845).]

ARTICULI APPROBATI A REVERENDISSIMIS DOMINIS D.D. JOANNE ARCHIEPISCOPO CANTUARIENSI, ET RICHARDO EPISCOPO LONDINENSI, ET ALIIS THEOLOGIS, LAMBETHÆ, NOVEMBRIS 20, ANNO 1595.

1. Deus ab æterno prædestina 1. God from eternity hath previt quosdam ad vitam, et quosdam destinated certain men unto life; ad mortem reprobavit.

certain men he hath reprobated. 2. Causa movens aut efficiens 2. The moving or efficient cause prædestinationis ad vitam non of predestination unto life is not est prævisio fidei, aut perseveran- the foresight of faith, or of pertiæ, aut bonorum operum, aut severance, or of good works, or of ullius rei, quæ insit in personis any thing that is in the person prædestinatis, sed sola voluntas predestinated, but only the good beneplaciti Dei.

will and pleasure of God. 3. Prædestinatorum præfinitus 3. There is predetermined a ceret certus numerus est qui nec tain number of the predestinate, augeri nec minui potest. which can neither be augmented

nor diminished. 4. Qui non sunt prædestinati 4. Those who are not predestiad salutem necessario propter nated to salvation shall be necespeccata sua damnabuntur. sarily damned for their sins.

5. Vera, viva [et] justificans 5. A true, living, and justifying fides, et Spiritus Dei sanctificans faith, and the Spirit of God justinon extinguitur, non excidit, non fying [sanctifying], is not extin

and all that are put in authority under him [her]:' to submit myself to all any governors, teachers, spiritual pastors and masters: to order myself lowly and reverently to all my betters: to hurt nobody by word nor deed: to be true and just in all my dealing: to bear no v.alice nor hatred in my heart: to keep my hands from picking and stealing, and my tongue from evil-speaking, lying, and slandering: to keep my body in temperance, soberness, and chastity: not to covet nor desire other men's goods; but to learn and labor truly to get mine own living, and to do my duty in that state of life unto which it shall please God to call me.

Catechist. My good child, know this, that thou art not able to do these things of thyself, nor to walk in the commandments of God, and to serve him, without his special grace; which thou must learn at all times to call for by diligent prayer. Let me hear, therefore, if thon canst say the Lord's Prayer.

Answer. Our Father, which art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive them that* trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil. Amen.

Ques. What desirest thou of God in this Prayer?

Ans. I desire my Lord God our heavenly Father, who is the giver of all goodness, to send his grace unto me, and to all people; that we may worship him, serve him, and obey him, as we ought to do. And I pray unto God, that he will send 118 all things that be needful both for our souls and bodies; and that he will be merciful unto us, and forgive us our sins; and that it will please him to save and defend us in all dangers, ghostly and bodily;' and that he will keep us from all sin and wickedness, and from our ghostly enemy, and from everlasting death. And this I trust he will do of his mercy and goodness, through our Lord Jesus Christ. And therefore I say, Amen, so be it.

· Amer. ed. : The civil authority. The editions before 1661 read instead: "The King and his Ministers.'

· Substituted for the original son in the edition of 1552. 3 Amer. ed.: who.

5 Amer. ed.: both of soul and body. • Amer. ed.: those who.

• Amer. ed. : spiritual.

Ques. How many Sacraments hath Christ ordained in his Church?

Ans. Two only, as generally necessary to salvation: that is to say, Baptism, and the Supper of the Lord.

Ques. What meanest thou by this word Sacrament?

Ans. I mean an outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual grace given unto us, ordained by Christ himself as a means whereby we receive the same, and a pledge to assnre us thereof.

Ques. How many parts are there in a Sacrament?
Ans. Two: the outward visible sign, and the inward spiritual grace.
Ques. What is the outward visible sign or form in Baptism?

Ans. Water; wherein the person is baptized' IN THE NAME OF THE FATHER, AND OF THE SON, AND OF THE HOLY GHOST.

Ques. What is the inward and spiritual grace?

Ans. A death unto sin, and a new birth unto righteousness : for, being by nature born in sin, and the children of wrath, we are hereby made the children of grace.

Ques. What is required of persons to be baptized ?

Ans. Repentance, whereby they forsake sin; and Faith, whereby they steadfastly believe the promises of God made to them in that Sacrament.

Ques. Why, then, are infants baptized, when by reason of their tender age they can not perform them?

Ans. Because they promise them both by their Sureties ;? which promise, when they come to age, themselves are bonnd to perform.

Ques. Why was the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper ordained ?

Ans. For the continual remembrance of the sacrifice of the death of Christ, and of the benefits which we receive thereby.

Ques. What is the outward part or sign of the Lord's Supper?

Ans. Bread and wine, which the Lord hath commanded to be received.

Ques. What is the inward part, or thing signified ?

Ans. The body and blood of Christ, which are verily and indeed taken and received by the faithful in the Lord's Supper.

Edition of 1604: the person baptized is dipped, or sprinkled with it. The change was made in 1661.

* Ed. of 1604: Yes; they do perform them by their Sureties, who promise and vow them both in their names: which, etc.

THE IRISH ARTICLES OF RELIGION. A.D. 1615.

[The Irish Articles-probably composed by the learned Archbishop James Ussher (then Professor of Divinity in Dublin), and adopted by the Archbishops, Bishops, and Convocation of the Irish Episcopal Church, and approved by the Viceroy in 1616, four years before the Synod of Dort-although practically superseded by the Thirty-nine Articles, are important as a testimony of the prevailing Calvinism of the leading divines in that Church, which had previously been expressed also in the nine Lambeth Articles. They are still more important as the connecting link between the Thirty-nine Articles and the Westminster Confession, and as the chief source of the latter. The agreement of the two formularies in the order of subjects, the headings of chapters, and in many single phrases, as well as in spirit and sentiment, is very striking. See the comparison in Dr. Alex. F. Mitchell's Minutes of the Westminster Assembly of Divines, Edinb. 1874, Introd. pp. xlvi. sqq. On the history and authority of the Irish Articles see Hardwick's History of the Articles of Religion, 2d ed. pp. 181 sqq.

The text is taken from the original edition of 1616, as appended to Dr. Elrington's Life of Archbishop Ussher (in Works of the Most Rev. James Ussher, Dublin, 1847, Vol. I. Appendix IV.), and reprinted in Hardwick's History, Append. Sixtb, pp. 361 sqq. He added a few references to the Lambeth Articles. The spelling is here modernized.]

ARTICLES OF RELIGION, Agreed upon by the Archbishops and Bishops, and the rest of the

Clergy of Ireland, in the Convocation holden at Dublin in the Year of our Lord God 1615, for the Avoiding of Diversities of Opin. ions, and the Establishing of Consent touching True Religion.

OF THE HOLY SCRIPTURE AND THE THREE CREEDS.

1. The ground of our religion and the rule of faith and all saving truth is the Word of God, contained in the holy Scripture.

2. By the name of holy Scripture we understand all the Canonical Books of the Old and New Testament, viz. :

Of the Old Testament. The Five Books of Moses.

Job. Joshua.

Psalms. Judges.

Proverbs. Ruth.

Ecclesiastes. . The First and Second of Samuel.

The Song of Solomon. The First and Second of Kings.

Isaiah. The First and Second of Chronicles. Jeremiah, his Prophecy and Lamentation. Ezra.

Ezekiel. Nehemiah.

Daniel. Esther.

The Twelve lesser Prophets.

The Gospels according to
Matthew,
Mark,

Of the New Testament.

Luke,
John,
The Acts of the Apostles.

THE LAMBETH ARTICLES. A.D. 1595.

[The Lambeth Articles are a Calvinistic Appendix to the Thirty-nine Articles. They were composed by Dr. Whitaker, Regius Professor of Divinity at Cambridge, whose original draft (Hardwick, pp. 344 347) was still more ad mentem Calvini,' in opposition to the nine propositions of Barret (see Strype's Whitgift, Vol. III. p. 320). They were formally approved by the Archbishop of Canterbury (Dr. Whitgift), the Archbishop of York (Dr. Matthew Hutton, who indorsed the first article with 'verissimum,' and approved the rest), and a number of prelates convened at Lambeth Palace, London, Nov. 20, 1595, but not sanctioned by Queen Elizabeth (who was rather displeased with the convening of a synod without her royal permission), and met with considerable opposition. They were accepted by the Dublin Convocation of 1615, and engrafted on the Irish Articles. During the Armivian reaction under the Staarts they lost their authority.

The Latin text is taken from Strype's Life and Acts of John Whitgift, Vol. II. p. 280 (Oxford edition, 1822). Strype copied it from the authentic M8. of the Lord Treasurer (probably presented to him by Dr. Whitaker).

The English text is from Thomas Fuller's Church History of Britain, Vol. III. p. 147 (London edition of 1837, or Vol. V. p. 220 of the Oxford University Press ed. 1845).]

LAMBETHE,

ARTICULI APPROBATI A REVERENDISSIMIS DOMINIS D.D. JOANNE ARCHIEPISCOPO CANTUARIENSI, ET RICHARDO EPISCOPO LONDINENSI, ET ALIIS THEOLOGIS,

NOVEMBRIS 20, ANNO 1595. 1. Deus ab æterno prædestina 1. God from eternity hath previt quosdam ad vitam, et quosdam destinated certain men unto life; ad mortem reprobavit.

certain men he hath reprobated. 2. Causa movens aut efficiens 2. The moving or efficient cause prædestinationis ad vitam non of predestination unto life is not est prævisio fidei, aut perseveran- the foresight of faith, or of pertiæ, aut bonorum operum, aut severance, or of good works, or of ullius rei, quo insit in personis any thing that is in the person prædestinatis, sed sola voluntas predestinated, but only the good beneplaciti Dei.

will and pleasure of God. 3. Prædestinatorum præfinitus 3. There is predetermined a ceret certus numerus est qui nec tain number of the predestinate, augeri nec minui potest. which can neither be augmented

nor diminished. 4. Qui non sunt prædestinati 4. Those who are not predestiad salutem necessario propter nated to salvation shall be necespeccata sua damnabuntur. sarily damned for their sins.

5. Vera, viva [et] justificans 5. A true, living, and justifying fides, et Spiritus Dei sanctificans faith, and the Spirit of God justinon extinguitur, non excidit, non fying [sanctifying], is not extin

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