The Lamp of Lothian, Or, The History of Haddington: In Connection with the Public Affairs of East Lothian and of Scotland : from the Earliest Records to the Present Period

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James Allen, 1844 - East Lothian (Scotland) - 528 pages
 

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Page 287 - I'll never love thee more. As Alexander I will reign, And I will reign alone ; My thoughts did evermore disdain A rival on my throne. He either fears his fate too much, Or his deserts are small, Who dares not put it to the touch To gain or lose it all.
Page 497 - Crown, and better securing the rights and liberties of the subject, is and stands limited to the Princess Sophia, Electress and Duchess Dowager of Hanover and the heirs of her body being protestants. And all these things I do plainly and sincerely acknowledge and swear according to these express words by me spoken and according to the plain and common sense and understanding of the same words without any equivocation, mental evasion or secret reservation whatsoever. And I do make this recognition,...
Page 1 - Thy streams unfailing in the summer's drought: Unmatch'd thy guardian oaks ; thy valleys float With golden waves ; and on thy mountains flocks Bleat numberless ; while roving round their sides, Bellow the blackening herds in lusty droves.
Page 497 - and Attempts whatsoever, which shall be made against his "Person, Crown or Dignity; and I will do my utmost Endea"vour to disclose...
Page 195 - For modes of faith let graceless zealots fight; His can't be wrong whose life is in the right...
Page 497 - An Act for the further limitation of the crown, and better securing the rights and liberties of the subject...
Page 268 - The foe! they come! they come!' And wild and high the 'Cameron's gathering' rose! The war-note of Lochiel, which Albyn's hills Have heard, and heard, too, have her Saxon foes: How in the noon of night that pibroch thrills, Savage and shrill! But with the breath which fills Their...
Page 33 - To break the Scottish circle deep, That fought around their King. But yet, though thick the shafts as snow, Though charging knights like whirlwinds go, Though bill-men ply the ghastly blow, Unbroken was the ring ; The stubborn spearmen still made good, Their dark impenetrable wood, Each stepping where his comrade stood, The instant that he fell.
Page 417 - Hail to the State of England ! And conjoin With this a salutation as devout, Made to the spiritual fabric of her Church ; Founded in truth ; by blood of Martyrdom Cemented ; by the hands of Wisdom reared In beauty of holiness, with ordered pomp, Decent, and unreproved.
Page 247 - He made a very ill appearance : he was very big : his hair red, hanging oddly about him : his tongue was too big for his mouth, which made him bedew all that he talked to : and his whole manner was rough and boisterous, and very unfit for a court.

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