The Parliamentary Or Constitutional History of England: Being a Faithful Account of All the Most Remarkable Transactions in Parliament, from the Earliest Times. Collected from the Journals of Both Houses, the Records, Original Manuscripts, Scarce Speeches, and Tracts; All Compared Withthe Several Contemporary Writers, and Connected, Throughout, with the History of the Times. By Several Hands...

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Printed; and sold by T. Osborne; and W. Sandby, 1751 - Constitutional history
 

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Page 453 - ... doth not forget, that the parliament is his council, and therefore ought to have the liberty of a council ; but his majesty understands the difference betwixt council and controlling, and between liberty and the abuse of liberty. This being...
Page 5 - there be to (hew Love between you and me, and * between me and you, that are the Reprefentative ' Body, in a right Underftanding, than, out of my * own Mouth and Direction, to give you a Tafte ' of my Love and Care of you all. * The Properties and Caufes of calling a Parlia...
Page 124 - ... all such armour, gunpowder, and munition of any kind, as any of them have, either in their own hands, or in the hands of any other for them ; and to...
Page 404 - 1625. the King had given him Command to bid you name the Enemy yourfelves. Put the Sword into his Majefty's Hands, and he will employ it to your Honour, and the Good of true Religion. As you iffue nothing that is loft, fo it will bring home fomewhat again ; and from henceforth maintain the War by the Perquifites thereof. Make but once an Entrance, it may afterwards be maintain'd with Profit. When the Enemy is declared , you may have Letters of Marque ; none (hall be denied. And I have not been fo...
Page 389 - Schoolmafters, and they to be enjoined to catechize and inftrudl their Scholars in the Grounds and Principles of true Religion. And whereas, by many Complaints from divers Parts of the Kingdom, it doth plainly appear, That fundry...
Page 34 - Articles fhould be perfectly digefted ; yet, by the Prince's fix'd and conftant Refolution, the Contrary was at the laft obtain'd. And now the Articles are laid upon the Anvil again, and the two Days of their Hammering fpun out to twenty ; at the End whereof they brought them in with new Additions and Alterations, hoping that his Highnefs, through Hafte or Unadvifednefs, would fhut his Eyes, and fup them up without more ado. But the Prince read them, found out the Alterations, and upbraided them...
Page 320 - Charles for favouring the impeachment ; he told the duke that he was a fool, and was making a rod for his own breech...
Page 9 - Modefty, whereby you may have my Prayers * to God for you, and procure the Love of me, * and an happy End to this Parliament. ' God judge me, I fpeak as a...
Page 397 - Dufce of Buckingham, whatever he was as a Minifter, was both a very great Politician, and an excellent Orator. The Lord Keeper next proceeded to give the *' remaining Part of his Report, which was the Sequel of the Duke's Speech. He faid his Grace chofe rather to proceed in it by way of Queftion and Anfwer, than in one continued Speech, as being the fpeedier Way and Means to yield Satisfaction to the Commons. He would take his Rife, he faid, from the Breach of the Treaties and Alliance, and put fome...
Page 458 - Cook told you, it was better to be eaten up by a foreign enemy, than to be destroyed at home; indeed, I think it more honour for a King to be invaded, and almost destroyed by a foreign enemy, than to be despised by his own subjects.

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