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THE MAIN STREET OF AN OKLAHOMA TOWN ON AUGUST 6TH

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O Churchmen realize what a great a spot on the prairie; to-day it is a

tide of American emigration is bustling metropolis of 40,000 people. sweeping into the region somewhat in- Five years ago the very name of Tulsa

definitely called “The was hardly known; now it is a city of The Growth Southwest"? On a 15,000 people. At point after point, the of the

single day last virgin prairie of a few years ago is now Southwest month, when the the site of growing towns. Bishop

editor happened to Brooke has been struggling manfully to be in Houston, Texas, nearly 1,000 meet these changing conditions and this "home-seekers” passed through the city, great influx of population. Comparativeby various railroad lines, on their way ly few Church people have come in with to other parts of the state to take up the tide, yet the number of communigovernment

or purchase farms cants during Bishop Brooke's episcopate already held by private interests. Those has increased from about 200 to close 1,000 people were only a very small upon 2,700. From one point of view, fraction of the multitude, estimated at the figures may seem trifling enough, fully 100,000 a month, that is pushing but when it is remembered that our into this section. For some years we clergy in Oklahoma have never numhave been familiar with the wonderful bered more than twenty-four, while the growth and development of Oklahoma, Methodists alone can point to nearly though, perhaps, the spectacular "rushes" 500 clergy and local preachers, the wonto secure claims upon newly-opened land der is that so much has been accomhave detracted from the real significance plished for the Church. of what has been going on. People who think of the most recently admitted

Oklahoma is state of the Union as typical of frontier Changing becoming too closeconditions are simply a decade or more Conditions ly settled and too behind the times. In the last fifteen

conventional in its years the population of Oklahoma has life for many people and they are joinincreased from about 275,000 (about ing with others in the movement into 70,000 of these Indians) to a population what might be called the hinterland of of over 1,500,000. Prosperous towns are

the Southwest. Four or five years ago on every hand. Eighteen years ago

the “Texas Panhandle” was the paradise Oklahoma City was scarcely more than

of the cattle men. The writer remem

now

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THE MAIN STREET OF THE SAME TOWN ON AUGUST 16TH OF THE SAME YEAR

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ON NOVEMBER 6TH OF THE SAME YEAR THE MAIN STREET OF THE SAME TOWN

them not forget the work for righteousness and for the national welfare that must be done in the new Southwest.

MA

last year

was

Southwest The people settling there are Americans, chiefly from the states of the Mississippi valley. In many instances they are people who have once in the course of their lives moved into a new country, subdued its rudeness, and made prosperous farms which they are now able to sell at prices far in advance of the original outlay, while they in turn pass on to a new region, where land is cheap and where new communities are to be established and developed.

As an expression of The Real national economics, Question at Issue this movement is

suggestive; as a social study, it is highly interesting; but the real question at issue is, What is to be the moral and religious tone of these new communities? Shall the Church keep pace with this development and all this forward movement, or shall it lag behind ? Must our frontier bishops stand by helpless because they have neither men nor money while they see thousands who need the Church's ministrations coming into their districts month by month? Conditions in these newer communities should be much more favorable to the planting of churches and the creation of strong moral sentiment than was the case in the early days in the states from which most of these "home-seekers” are coming. In his suggestive study of “The Church and the Mining Camps" in this issue, Bishop Spalding makes the point that the second generation of mining camps begin their life on a higher moral plane simply because they are for the most part peopled by those who have been under the influence of Christian teaching in the older camps.

This should be true of new communities settled by those who have known something of the refining and uplifting influences of the home mission campaign in the central West. While our strong eastern dioceses are endeavoring to extend the Church within their own borders, and trying, in some measure, at least, to meet the grave problems presented by the incoming tide of low-grade foreign populations, let

ANY will regret that the income for

the last two months shows a slight falling off as compared with the previous

year. The income of The Financial

in Outlook

turn somewhat less

than the income for the first few months of the fiscal year beginning September 1st, 1905, so that the net decrease from September 1st, 1907, to January 1st, 1908, as compared with the same period for 1905-6, is $11,772.21. From one point of view this is not a serious decrease. Every one will agree, however, that a steady increase from year to year, and for each month of the fiscal year, is necessary for the best interests of the Church's Mission. In some dioceses there have been slight: gains as compared with the previous two years; in others there has been a marked falling off. In many instances this is doubtless due to variation in the time of taking the offering. For instance, the entire decrease of the present fiscal year is more than covered by the falling off in one diocese. To January 1st, last year, four of its congregations had given over $21,000. To January 1st, this year, these same congregations had given only $614. This no doubt will be made up before the end of February. However this may be, it is highly important that we should not accustom ourselves to even temporary decreases, but should deavor month by month to go forward to larger things. The appropriations of the Board are larger by about $65,000 this year than last. With a growing work, with opportunities on every hand, with needs that only the Christian Gospel can meet, it is inevitable that this should be the case.

Whatever economies may be necessary as a result of the so-called "period of depression" through which the country is passing, let us not begin with a curtailment of the support given to the work of making our Lord known and loved.

en

BEGINNING WORK IN WESTERN

COLORADO

BY BISHOP KNIGHT

A TOWN WHERE THE CHURCH'S VOICE HAD BEEN HEARD BUT ONCE-GATHERING A CONGREGATION FROM POST-OFFICE, STORES AND HOMES-CHILDREN TO BE BAPTIZED-ADULTS TO BE INSTRUCTED—THE PIONEER EFFORT OF MR. OSTENSON

W

more

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E came from Trenton ered about a dozen people together in a

directly to Glenwood house and the Rev. Mr. DuBois bapSprings, and on Sunday, tized the babies. At night we had ser

January 5th, we had two vice at the Congregational church, with splendid services which were largely at- more than a hundred people present. tended.

The service was simple, but very hearty, I suggested to the clergyman at all taking part gladly as I explained the Glenwood, the Rev. Mr. DuBois, that service to them, and I have never we go on Monday, the Feast of the preached to a more reverent and attenEpiphany, to Newcastle, a mountain tive congregation. At the service we town about fifteen miles off. Taking found several

people of a few prayer books and hymnals we Church, both men and women, and we started off. Newcastle is a typical west- learned of a few more children for bapern town, with a population of 500 or tism at a later visit. The clergyman at 600 people. There is a small Roman Glenwood Springs will go to Newcastle church where they have occasional ser- once a month hereafter and all the peovices, and Congregational church ple, without regard to denomination, without a pastor. We secured permis- promise loyal support and effort to make sion to use the latter for an evening

the service a success. service and then started out among the I learned from a good Churchwoman people. We called at the public school who was present that the Rev. Mr. Osand talked to the children, we called at tenson, who did splendid work in this the post-office, several stores, one saloon county for so many years, visited New-not for drink—and from door to door castle and held services once about ten among the dwelling houses, so far as years ago. This, so far as I can learn, time permitted. We found fifteen or is the only time our Church's voice has twenty persons who had been connected been heard in the community. Already with our Church and who were very I have my eye upon several towns where glad to welcome us. Among these, to- a like work can be done, and as I begether with another family, we found come acquainted with the district I five babies whose parents wanted them shall, without doubt, find more. I shall baptized.

never be satisfied until our dear old Those not of our Church, however, Church is bringing her glorious influwere no less cordial in their greetings

ence-in

at least-in and their welcome when we told them of every town and hamlet in Western Colour mission and our object in coming orado, being indeed, throughout the among them. Toward evening we gath- land, "a witness of His Resurrection.”

some

measure

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T

BY THE REVEREND S. HARRINGTON LITTELL A Heathen Priests Testimony to

credit for his god's insight and wise an

swer when the man is entirely well. It the Worth of Christian Doctors

was an unusual thing to have such a HE other day in one of our sta

response from an idol; but in the event

the answer tions, a man sent for the mis

Thus the

was justified. sion physician. The doctor in- heathen pay their tribute to Christ, and quired how the man heard of

the ignorant Buddhist priest points his him, and was told, “The idol sent me to

fellow-countrymen to the true religion. you.” That was not very clear, so the

Chinese Archery doctor asked about it. The man told To-day, as we took our exercise, we him that he had been ill for a long saw relics of a past stage of Chinese histime, and had tried all sorts of native tory, men showing their skill in archery. doctors and drugs. At last, after de- This sport has always been considered riving no benefit from the treatments he one of the six Chinese "accomplishhad tried, he bethought himself of a cer- ments,” and its value as a means to offitain temple where he felt sure he could cial advance and emolument has been find help. The particular idol there was great (though to a westerner the confamed for power to work cures. So he nection does not appear close at first went, or sent someone, and inquired of sight). The examinations in the sport the priest what to do to get well. The are going on now, and have been held in priest asked the god, and said, "The god sections for some weeks. As you walk says: ‘Call the foreign doctor.' So it in certain parts of the city, you have to is," said the man, “that the idol sent me watch out, or you will get hit. The to you." The priest had evidently heard

shooters put up their targets anywhere of our doctor's work, and had full con- they like-in public ways, as well as in fidence in his skill. He also had an eye safe places and shoot away, regardless to himself and his temple, and will claim of everybody.

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