The Family friend [ed. by R.K. Philp]., Volume 1

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Robert Kemp Philp
 

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Page 61 - Where there is much desire to learn, there of necessity will be much arguing, much writing, many opinions ; for opinion in good men is but knowledge in the making.
Page 135 - A blank, my lord : She never told her love, But let concealment, like a worm i...
Page 216 - A primrose by the river's brim A yellow primrose was to him, And it was nothing more.
Page 231 - There are in this loud stunning tide Of human care and crime, With whom the melodies abide Of the everlasting chime ; Who carry music in their heart Through dusky lane and wrangling mart, Plying their daily task with busier feet, Because their secret souls a holy strain repeat.
Page 239 - Who bid the stork, Columbus-like, explore Heavens not his own, and worlds unknown before? Who calls the council, states the certain day ? Who forms the phalanx, and who points the way ? III.
Page 146 - Fair clime! where every season smiles Benignant o'er those blessed isles, Which, seen from far Colonna's height, Make glad the heart that hails the sight, And lend to loneliness delight. There mildly dimpling, Ocean's cheek Reflects the tints of many a peak Caught by the laughing tides that lave These Edens of the Eastern wave...
Page 26 - THERE is this difference between happiness and wisdom ; he that thinks, himself the happiest man, really is so ; but he that thinks himself the wisest, is generally the greatest fool.
Page 164 - ... the sparrow, I say, flying in at one door, and immediately out at another, whilst he is within, is safe from the wintry storm ; but after a short space of fair weather, he immediately vanishes out of your sight, into the dark winter from which he had emerged.
Page 26 - It cannot be too deeply impressed on the mind that application is the price to be paid for mental acquisitions, and that it is as absurd to expect them without it, as to hope for a harvest where we have not sown the seed.
Page 100 - Divine, not with magic virtue, bearing a silver cross for their banner, and the image of our Lord and Saviour painted on a board ; and singing the litany, they offered up their prayers to the Lord for the eternal salvation both of themselves and of those to whom they were come.

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