Law Notes, Volume 23

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E. Thompson Company, 1920 - Law

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Page 137 - to quote, en passant, a description of malice as found in the familiar lines: 'Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And without sneering teach the rest to sneer.' Or, as the Book of Common Prayer hath it: 'Envy, malice and all uncharitableness.
Page 158 - A word is not a crystal, transparent and unchanged, it is the skin of a living thought and may vary greatly in color and content according to the circumstances and the time in which it is used."—Per Mr. Justice Holmes in Towne v. Eisner, 245 US 425.
Page 217 - It arose from the nature of the goods, the size of the purchase, and the terms of the label. It is provided by the Sales Act (Stat. 1908, chap. 237), 15 (1): 'Where the buyer, expressly or by implication, makes known to the seller the particular purpose for which the goods are required, and it appears that the buyer relies on
Page 67 - Every act shall embrace but one subject, and matters properly connected therewith, which subject shall be expressed in the title. But if any subject shall be embraced in an act which shall not be expressed in the title, such act shall be void only as to so much thereof as shall not be expressed in the title.
Page vi - •where the buyer makes known to the seller the particular purpose for -which the goods are required, and the goods are of a description which it is in the course of the seller's business to supply; in such a case
Page 217 - seller's skill and judgment, whether he be the grower or manufacturer or not, there is an implied warranty that the goods shall be reasonably fit for such purpose.' That provision governs the relations of the parties in the case at bar.
Page 169 - But those powers and sovereign rights, which the people did not delegate, they reserved to the states respectively, not collectively, or to themselves, that is, to the peoples respectively of the several states. "No political dreamer was ever wild enough to think of breaking down the lines which separate the states, and of compounding the American people into one common mass.
Page 67 - But if any subject shall be embraced in an act which shall not be expressed in the title, such act shall be void only as to so much thereof as shall not be expressed in the title.
Page vi - namely, trusts for the relief of poverty, trusts for the advancement of education, trusts for the advancement of religion, and trusts for other purposes beneficial to the community not falling under any of the preceding heads. In Re
Page 167 - States ratifying the Constitution, and the remaining few who do not become parties to it] The first question is answered at once by recurring to the absolute necessity of the case; to the great principle of self-preservation ; to the transcendent law of nature and of nature's God, which declares that

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