Memoirs of Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough, and of the Court of Queen Anne, Volume 2

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 38 - I have not time to say more, but to beg you will give my duty to the queen, and let her know her army has had a glorious victory. M. Tallard and two other generals are in my coach, and I am following the rest. The bearer, my aide-de-camp, Colonel Parke, will give her an account of what has passed. I shall do it in a day or two, by another more at large. — MARLBOROUGH...
Page 35 - Germany, where it would be impossible for you to follow me; but love me as you now do, and no hurt can come to me. You have by this kindness preserved my quiet, and I believe my life; for till I had this letter I have been very indifferent of what should become of myself.
Page 35 - Harwich out of my strong box and have burnt it; and if you will give me leave it will be a great pleasure to me to have it in my power to read this dear dear letter often, and that it may be found in my strong box when I am dead.
Page 38 - Tallard and two other generals are in my coach, and I am following the rest. The bearer, my aide-de-camp, Colonel Parke, will give her an account of what has passed. I shall do it in a day or two, by another more at large. — MARLBOROUGH."* The fate of the troops posted in Blenheim still remained undecided.
Page 91 - ... jealousy. Particularly I remembered that a long while before this, being with the Queen (to whom I had gone very privately by a secret passage from my lodgings to the Bedchamber), on a sudden this woman, not knowing I was there, came in with the boldest and gayest air possible, but upon sight of me stopped, and immediately, changing her manner and making a most solemn curtsey, " Did your Majesty ring ?
Page 50 - Queen might live till she did not know what she did, and be like a child in the hands of others...
Page 163 - Queen the next morning, before she went to the trial, and told her that I had observed, the day before, that the Duchess of Somerset had refused to sit at the trial, which I did not know the meaning of, since her Majesty was pleased to order it, and...
Page 443 - ... it will cost an immense sum to complete the causeway, and that ridiculous bridge, in which I counted 33 rooms. Four houses are to be at each corner of the bridge ; but that which makes it so much prettier than London bridge is, that you may sit in six rooms and look out at a window into the high arch, while the coaches are driving over your head.
Page 90 - And in less than a week's time I discovered, that my cousin was become an absolute favourite ; that the Queen herself was present at her marriage in Dr Arbuthnot's lodgings, at which time Her Majesty had called for a round sum out of the privy purse ; that Mrs Masham came often to the Queen, when the Prince was asleep, and was generally two hours every day in private with her. And I likewise then discovered beyond all dispute Mr Harley's correspondence and interest at court by means of this woman.
Page 561 - Pitt was then one of the poor; and to him Heaven directed a portion of the wealth of the haughty Dowager. She left him a legacy of ten thousand pounds, in consideration of " the noble defence he had made for the support of the laws of England, and to prevent the ruin of his country.

Bibliographic information