Some remarkable passages, in the life of the Hon. Col. James Gardiner: who was slain at the battle of Preston Pans, September 21, 1745. To which is added, the sermon, occasioned by his heroick death

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Printed by H. Ranlet, for I. Thomas and E.T. Andrews, 1795 - Funeral sermons - 250 pages
 

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Page 238 - For our light affli&ion, which is but for a moment worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory ; (here this author admits eternal in the ftri<fb fenfe) while we look not at the things which are feen, but at the things which are not feen : for the things which are feen are temporal ; but the things which are not feen are eternal.
Page 238 - For which cause we faint not ; but though our outward man perish, yet the inward man is renewed day by day. For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory...
Page 200 - Colonel at the beginning of the onset, which in the whole lasted but a few minutes, received a wound by a bullet in his left breast, which made him give a sudden spring in his saddle ; upon which his servant, who...
Page 41 - Sabbath) in some gay company, and had an unhappy assignation with a married woman, whom he was to attend exactly at twelve. The company broke up about eleven; and not judging it convenient to anticipate the time appointed, he went into his chamber to kill the tedious hour, perhaps with some amusing book, or some other way. But it very accidentally happened that he took up a religious book, which his good mother or aunt had, without his knowledge, slipped into his portmanteau.
Page 200 - Events of this kind pass in less time than the description of them can be written, or than it can be read. The Colonel was for a few moments supported by...
Page 41 - ... other way. But it very accidentally happened, that he took up a religious book, which his good mother or aunt had, without his knowledge, slipped into his portmanteau. It was called, if I remember the title exactly, The Christian Soldier, or Heaven taken by Storm, and it was written by Mr Thomas Watson.
Page 18 - ... of his tongue, went through his neck, and came out about an inch and a half on the left side of the vertebrae.
Page 84 - Paradise; for he says that he could not tell whether he was in the body or out of the body.
Page 201 - Gardiner seemed to be making a pause to deliberate what duty required him to do in such...
Page 96 - twould ne'er be night; Fondly I said within my heart, " Pleasure and peace shall ne'er depart." 2 But I forgot thine arm was strong, Which made my mountain stand so long : Soon as thy face began to hide, My health was gone, my comforts died.

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