Page images
PDF
EPUB

PREFACE.

THE volume to which this leaf is prefixed is the thirtysixth of a work that has yielded more than five thousand pounds to the necessitous widows of deceased ministers, among whom its profits have been divided.

It is also the seventh of a series intrusted to the superintendence of the present editor. He desires to acknowledge the candour with which bis efforts to render it subservient to the highest interests of the baptist churches have been received by many of the most respected of their ministers and deacons, and to say that he values highly the expressions of approbation with which he is occasionally favoured.

To conduct the Magazine in accordance with the motto that has been for so many years on its title-page,—"speaking the truth in love;" to cherish a spirit of harmonious co-operation among all who are of one mind in reference to that divine institution by which believers “put on Christ ;” and to promote the consistency, the spiritual-mindedness, and the efficiency of those churches which are formed on New Testament principles, are objects which the editor wishes to keep continually in view, and for which he labours night and day. How far his endeavours are successful, it is for others to determine.

WILLIAM GROSER.

London, November 25, 1844.

THE

BAPTIST MAGAZINE.

JANUARY, 1844.

MEMOIR OF THE LATE REV. JOHN FOSTER.

It is presumed that any account of so John Foster was born in September, eminent a person as Mr. Foster, will be 1770. His parents were persons in humread with avidity, provided it contain ble life, residing on a small farm at some facts and incidents in his history. Wadsworth, near Hebden Bridge, YorkThe difficulty of furnishing many details shire. His father was a weaver by trade, in a life so little varied as his, must be and brought up his son John at first to obvious. We await with much interest his own occupation. Both his parents the appearance of a memoir, preparing, were eminently pious, and converts, we we hear, under the eye of his family. have heard, originally of Mr. WhiteMeanwhile, to allay the eager expecta- field's preaching, but were subsequently tion of our readers, we shall attempt baptized and united to the church under such a brief account of him as our the care of the Rev. Dr. Fawcett, the opportunities have enabled us to pre- author of the celebrated essay on Anger. pare. In venturing on such a sketch we They were also persons remarkable for must bespeak the lenient judgment of our masculine sense, and, without superior readers. We approach, with unfeigned advantages, commanded the respect and diffidence, a task which only one friend esteem of their pastor and fellow-memof Mr. Foster's, of all persons living, is bers. Their piety was exempt from perfectly competent for, or could engage those weaknesses, which the youth now in, without risk of failure. Ours will be growing up under their eye was afterlittle more than a brief outline of his life wards to describe so forcibly, but which in its few dates and movements, in which he must have observed elsewhere than we shall avail ourselves freely of the in- under the parental roof. He ever reformation supplied in the excellent dis- ferred to his parents with gratitude, as course of the Rev. T. S. Crisp, preached persons of the truest worth, and inon occasion of Mr. Foster's death, and stances of the happiest union of piety which we earnestly recommend to the and good sense. perusal of our readers.

Under the prudent care of this pious VOL. VII.-FOURTH SERIES.

B

THE

BAPTIST MAGAZINE.

JANUARY, 1844.

MEMOIR OF THE LATE REV. JOHN FOSTER.

It is presumed that any account of so John Foster was born in September, eminent a person as Mr. Foster, will be 1770. His parents were persons in humread with avidity, provided it contain ble life, residing on a small farm at some facts and incidents in his history. Wadsworth, near Hebden Bridge, YorkThe difficulty of furnishing many details shire. His father was a weaver by trade, in a life so little varied as his, must be and brought up his son Jobn at first to obvious. We await with much interest his own occupation. Both his parents the appearance of a memoir, preparing, were eminently pious, and converts, we we hear, under the eye of his family. have heard, originally of Mr. WhiteMeanwhile, to allay the eager expecta- field's preaching, but were subsequently tion of our readers, we shall attempt baptized and united to the church under such a brief account of him as our the care of the Rev. Dr. Fawcett, the opportunities have enabled us to pre- author of the celebrated essay on Anger. pare. In venturing on such a sketch we They were also persons remarkable for must bespeak the lenient judgment of our masculine sense, and, without superior readers. We approach, with unfeigned advantages, commanded the respect and diffidence, a task which only one friend esteem of their pastor and fellow-memof Mr. Foster's, of all persons living, is bers. Their piety was exempt from perfectly competent for, or could engage those weaknesses, which the youth now in, without risk of failure. Ours will be growing up under their eye was afterlittle more than a brief outline of his life wards to describe so forcibly, but which in its few dates and movements, in which he must have observed elsewhere than we shall avail ourselves freely of the in- under the parental roof. He ever reformation supplied in the excellent dis- ferred to his parents with gratitude, as course of the Rev. T. S. Crisp, preached persons of the truest worth, and inon occasion of Mr. Foster's death, and stances of the happiest union of piety which we earnestly recommend to the and good sense. perusal of our readers.

Under the prudent care of this pious

VOL, VII.FOURTH SERIES.

B

« PreviousContinue »