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al from us niekuood's Maga aaraar admirat Sai smits that s bieh as Jeffre

They popular among sirds. But we are fildators

, and worship a image nor man that firmu. We may seem & the Pedlar with insu in that playful paralle

and ourselves; but na vrang again, for we de Sito do bim honour. We to say a few words on the

* Plain was his garb:

A man of kindlier nature. The rough might suit a rustic sire, prepared sports bath duties; yet he was a man And teasing ways of children vexed not no one could have passed without him: mark.

Indulgent listener was he to the tongue and nervous was his gait ; his limbs Of garrulous age; nor did the sick man's is whole figure breathed intelli

tale, nce.

To his fraternal sympathy addressed, ad compressed the freshness of his Obtain reluctant hearing." Leeks narrower circle of deep red,

Who can read the following lines, and d not tamed his eye, that under not think of Christopher North? cows,

“ Birds and beasts, and grey, had meanings, which it And the mute fish, that glances in the Fought

stream, wears of youth ; whilst, like a being And harmless reptile coiling in the sun, ade

And gorgeous insect hovering in the air, ny beings, he had wondrous skill

The fowl domestic, and the household end with knowledge of the years to

dogme,

In his capacious mind he loved them all." 7, or such as lie beyond the grave."

True that our love of our intellectual characters, we re the pleasing hope, that there “ The mute fish, that glances in the me striking points of resemblance, stream, ich, however, our modesty will is not incompatible with the practice ermit us to dwell—and in our of the “ angler's silent trade," or rements, more particularly in with the pleasure of " filling our panand Spherical Trigonometry.

niers." The Pedlar, too, we have Ele yet he lingered in the rudiments reason to know, was, like his poet and ence, and among her simplest laws, ourselves—a craftsman, and for love riangles— they were the stars of beat the molecatcher at busking a Heaven.

batch of May-flies. The question lent stars ! oft did he take delight whether Lascelles himself were his easure the altitude of some tall master at a green dragon, rag, s the eagle's birthplace,” &c. “ The harmless reptile coiling in the sun,

was with us. Give us but a we are not so sure about having once and a quadrant—and when a been bit by an adder, whom, in our nt in Jemmy Millar's class, we simplicity, we mistook for a slow-worm

have given you the altitude of the very day, by the by, on which we teeple in Glasgow or the Gor- were poisoned by a dish of toadstools,

by our own hand gathered for musbke the Pedlar, in a small party of rooms. But we have long given over Is, though not proud of the ac- chasing butterflies, and feel, as the lishment, we have been prevailed Pedlar did, that they are beautiful give a song—“ The Flowers of creatures, and that 'tis a sin, between orest," “ Roy's Wife," or " Auld finger and thumb, to compress their syne”

mealy wings. The household dog we At request would sing do, indeed, dearly love, though, when songs, the product of his native old Surly looks suspicious, we pru. hills;

Da

kad making such a personage t

wharacter in the Excursion. bis described as endowed by e vith a great intellect, a noble smatin

, a profound soul, and a walant. It will not be said that te keeps these her noblest gifts

human beings born in this or that sión of life: she gives them to a writes—for so, in the highest

they are to whom such gifts

; and not unfrequently, in an este place, of one of the Fortu

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dently keep out of the reach of his ful distribution of sweet sounde chair ng the soul, and eagerly im ol refreshing wat e industrious hy agh a parcha of drought

natur ble

d.

ceed

cured at ho and truth-and nowledge at a win A munmer be " tend

muuntain's dro

with their heroic blood, for hateful to And the influence of such education our ears the war-song,

and occupation among such natural

objects, Wordsworth expounds in “ Welcome to your gory bed,

some as fine poetry as

ever issued Or to victory!”

from the cells of philosophic thought, 'Tis our way to pass from gay to

“ So the foundations of his mind were grave matter, and often from a jocular to a serious view of the same subject

laid." it being natural to us—and having be. The boy had small need of books, come habitual from writing occasionally in Blackwood's Magazine. All the

“For many a tale world knows our admiration of Words- Traditionary, round the mountains hung, worth, and admits that we have done And many a legend, peopling the dark almost as much as Jeffrey to make

woods, his poetry popular among the “ edu- Nourished Imagination in her growth, cated circles. But we are not a na. And gave the mind that apprehensive

power tion of idolators, and worship neither graven image nor man that is born By which she is made quick to recognise

The moral properties and scope of things.” of a woman.

We may seem to have treated the Pedlar with insufficient But in the Manse there were booksrespect in that playful parallel be- and he read tween him and ourselves; but there “ Whate'er the minister's old shelf supyou are wrong again, for we desire

plied, thereby to do bim honour. We wish The life and death of martyrs, who susnow to say a few words on the wis- tained, dom of making such a personage the With will inflexible, those fearful pangs, chief character in the Excursion. Triumphantly displayed in records left

He is described as endowed by na. Of persecution and the Covenant.” ture with a great intellect, a noble

Can you not believe that by the imagination, a profound soul, and a

time he was as old as you were when tender heart. It will not be said that nature keeps these her noblest gifts you used to ride to the races on a for human beings born in this or that poney, by the side of your sire the condition of life : she gives them to squire, this boy was your equal in her favourites—for so, in the highest tutor all to yourself, and were then a

knowledge, though you had a private sense, they are to whom such gifts promising lad, as indeed you are now befall; and not unfrequently, in an obscure place, of one of the Fortu. after the lapse of a quarter of a cen.

tury ? True, as yet he “ had small NATI

Latin, and no Greek ;" but the ele. " The fulgent head ments of these languages are best Star-bright appears."

learned—trust us—by slow degreesWordsworth appropriately places the by the mind rejoicing in the conbirth of such a being in a humble sciousness of its growing facultiesdwelling in the Highlands of Scot- during leisure hours ofrom other land.

studies—as they were by the Athol

adolescent. A Scholar—in your sense ** Among the bills of Athol

was born ; of the wordhe might not be called, Where on a small heredit

even when he had reached his seAn unproductive slip

venteenth year, though probably he His parents, with the

ng would have puzzled you in Livy and dwelt:

Virgil - nor of English poetry had sus house!

Ging he read much—the less the better for

such a mind—at that age, and in that home condition for and aca winter “ Accumulated feelings pressed his heart “ tended With still increasing weight; he was o'er

powered

By nature, by the turbulence subdued ood

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Of his own mind, by mystery and hope, Sols

ountain's dreary And the first virgin passion of a soul

Communing with the glorious Universe.'

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“ Plain was his garb :

A man of kindlier nature. The rough Such as might suit a rustic sire, prepared sports For Sabbath duties; yet he was a man And teasing ways of children vexed not Whom no one could have passed without

him : remark.

Indulgent listener was he to the tongue Active and nervous was his gait; his limbs Of garrulous age ; nor did the sick man's And his whole figure breathed intelli

tale, gence.

To his fraternal sympathy addressed, · Time had compressed the freshness of his Obtain reluctant hearing.”

cheeks Into a narrower circle of deep red,

Who can read the following lines, and But had not tamed his eye, that under not think of Christopher North? brows,

“ Birds and beasts, Shaggy and grey, had meanings, which it

And the mute fish, that glances in the brought

stream, From years of youth ; whilst, like a being

And harmless reptile coiling in the sun, made

And gorgeous insect hovering in the air, Of many beings, he had wondrous skill

The fowl domestic, and the household To blend with knowledge of the years to

dogcome,

In his capacious mind he loved them all." Human, or such as lie beyond the grave."

True that our love of In our intellectual characters, we indulge the pleasing hope, that there The mute fish, that glances in the are some striking points of resemblance, stream,' on which, however, our modesty will is not incompatible with the practice not permit us to dwell—and in our of the “ angler's silent trade," or acquirements, more particularly in with the pleasure of “ filling our panPlane and Spherical Trigonometry.

niers." The Pedlar, too, we have “ While yet he lingered in the rudiments reason to know, was, like his poet and Of science, and among her simplest laws, ourselves—a craftsman, and for love His triangles— they were the stars of beat the molecatcher at busking a Heaven.

batch of May-flies. The question The silent stars ! oft did he take delight whether Lascelles himself were his To measure the altitude of some tall master at a green dragon,

crag, That is the eagle's birthplace," &c. “ The harmless reptile coiling in the sun," So it was with us. Give us but a we are not so sure about, having once base and a quadrant—and when a been bit by an adder, whom, in our student in Jemmy Millar's class, we simplicity, we mistook for a slow-worm could have given you the altitude of the very day, by the by, on which we any steeple in Glasgow or the Gore were poisoned by a dish of toadstools, bals.

by our own hand gathered for mushLike the Pedlar, in a small party of rooms. But we have long given over friends, though not proud of the ac- chasing butterflies, and feel

, as the complishment, we have been prevailed Pedlar did, that they are beautiful on to give a song-" The Flowers of creatures, and that 'tis a sin, between the Forest,"" Roy's Wife,” or “ Auld finger and thumb, to compress their Langsyne".

mealy wings. The household dog we “ At request would sing do, indeed, dearly love, though, when Old songs, the product of his native old Surly looks suspicious, we pru. bills;

dently keep out of the reach of liis A skilful distribution of sweet sounds.

chain

fowl." Feeding the soul, and eagerly imbit As cool refreshing water Of the industrious hry Through a parch'd

of drought Our natura amiable a chant." * AD

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1838.]

with their heroic blood, for hateful to And the influence of such education our ears the war-song,

and occupation among such natural

objects, Wordsworth expounds in " Welcome to your gory bed,

some as fine poetry as

ever issued Or to victory!'

from the cells of philosophic thought, 'Tis our way to pass from gay to

“ So the foundations of his mind were grave matter, and often from a jocular

laid." to a serious view of the same subjectit being natural to us—and having be

The boy had small need of bookscome habitual from writing occasionally in Blackwood's Magazine. All the

“For many a tale world knows our admiration of Words- Traditionary, round the mountains hung, worth, and admits that we have done And many a legend, peopling the dark

woods, almost as much as Jeffrey to make his poetry popular among the “ edu- Nourished Imagination in her growth, cated circles." But we are not a na- And gave the mind that apprehensive tion of idolators, and worship neither

power graven image nor man that is born By which she is made quick to recognise of a woman. We may seem to have The moral properties and scope of things.” treated the Pedlar with insufficient But in the Manse there were booksrespect in that playful parallel be- and he read tween him and ourselves; but there “ Whate'er the minister's old shelf supyou are wrong again, for we desire plied, thereby to do him honour. We wish The life and death of martyrs, who susnow to say a few words on the wis- tained, dom of making such a personage the With will inflexible, those fearful pangs, chief character in the Excursion. Triumphantly displayed in records left

He is described as endowed by na. Of persecution and the Covenant.” ture with a great intellect, a noble imagination, a profound soul, and a

Can you not believe that by the

time he was as old as you were when tender heart. It will not be said that

you used to ride to the races on a nature keeps these her noblest gifts for human beings born in this or that poney, by, the side of your sire the condition of life : she gives them to knowledge, though you had a private

squire, this boy was your equal in her favourites—for so, in the highest tutor all to yourself, and were then a sense, they are to whom such gifts promising lad, as indeed you are now befall; and not unfrequently, in an obscure place, of one of the Fortu- after the lapse of a quarter of a cen.

tury ? True, as yet he “ had small NATI

Latin, and no Greek ;" but the ele. “ The fulgent head ments of these languages are best Star-bright appears.”

learned—trust us—by slow degreesWordsworth appropriately places the by the mind rejoicing in the conbirth of such a being in a humble sciousness of its growing faculties--dwelling in the Highlands of Scot- during leisure hours from other land.

studies--as they were by the Athol

adolescent. A Scholar-in your sense “ Among the hills of Athol ho was born ; of the word he might not be called, Where on a small heredit

even when he had reached his seAn unproductive slip o

venteenth year, though probably he His parents, with the

ing would have puzzled you in Livy and dwelt;

Virgil - nor of English poetry had ous househ

ing he read much—the less the better for

such a mind—at that age, and in that home condition-for a winter “ Accumulated feelings pressed his heart

With still increasing weight; he was o'er

powered

By nature, by the turbulence subdued pod

and ac

" tended

Of his own mind, by mystery and hope, Sole

suntain's dreary And the first virgin passion of a soul

Communing with the glorious Universe."

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