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FAMILIAR LETTERS

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BEAUTIFUL YOUNG DAMSÈL TO HER PARENTS.

TROM A

PUBLISHED,

IN ORDER TO CULTIVATE THE PRINCIPLES OF VIRTUE AND RELIGION IN

THE MINDS OF THE YOUTH OF BOTH SEXES.

A NARRATIVE

WHICH HAS IT'S FOUNDATION IN TRUTH; AND AT THE SAME TIME THAT IT

AGR LEABLY ENTERTAINS, BY A VARIETY OF CURIOUS AND AFFECTING IN-
CIDENTS, IS ENTIRELY DIVESTED OF ALL THOSE IMAGES, WHICH IN 100
MASY PIECES CALCULATED FOR ANUSEMENT ONLY, TIND TO INFLAME THE
MINDS THEY SHOULD INSTRUCT.

TO WHICH ARE PREFIXID,

EXTRACTS FROM SEVERAL CURIOUS LETTERS,

WRITTEN TO THE EDITOR ON THE SUBJECT,

BY MR. SAMUEL RICHARDSON.

IN FOUR VOLUMES.

LONDON:
Printed for HARRISON and Co. No. 18, Paternoster Row.

MDCC LXXXV,

C. res it

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Preface by the Editor.

F to divert and entertain, and at the same time, to inftruet, and improve

the minds of the Youth of both fixés: If to inculcate religion and morality in so easy and agreeable a manner, as shall render them equally delightful and profitable:

If to set forth, in the most exemplary lights, the parental, the filial, and the social duties :

If to paint Vice in it's proper colours, to make it deservedly odious ; and to let Virtue in it's own amiable light, to make it lovely:

If to draw characters with justness, and to support them difinally:

If to raise a distress from natural causes, and excite compassion from jast ones :

If to teach the man of fortune how to use it; the man of passion, how to fubdue it; and the man of intrigue, how gracefully, and with honour to himself, to reclaim:

If to give practical examples, worthy to be followed in the most critical and affecting cases, by the virgin, the bride, and the wife:

If to effect all these good ends, without raifing a fingle idea throughout the whole that shall shock the exactest purity, even in the warmest of those instances where purity would be most apprehensive :

If these be laudable recommendations, the Editor of the following Lettess, which have their foundation in truth, ventures to assert that all these ends are obtained here; and writes with the more assurance of fuccefs, as an Editor may be allowed to judge with more impartiality than is often to be found in an Author,

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To the Editor of the Piece intituled PAMELA;

Pamela or, Virtue Rewarded.

I

DEAR SIR, Have had inexpressible pleasure in the porufal of your PAMELA. have you said one word too much in commendation of a piece that has advantages and excellencies peculiar to itself. For, beides the beautifal fimplicity of the file, and a happy propriety and clearnefs of expreffion, (the Leiters being written under the immediate impresion of every circumitance which occasioned them, and that to those who had a right to know the fair writer's most fecret thoughts) the several pations of the mind mutt, of course, be more affectingly described, and Nature may be traced in her undisguised inclinations with much more propriety and exactness than can pollibly be found in a detail of actions long pait, which are never recollected with the fame affections, hopes, and dreads, with which they were felt when they occurred.

This little book will infallibly be looked upon as the hitherto much-wanted standard or pattern for this kind of writing: for it abounds with lively images and pictures; with incidents natural, fur. prizing, and perfectly adapted io the story; with circumítances inte. refting to persons in common life, as well as to those in exalted stations. The greatest regard is everywhere paid in it to decency, and to every duty of life: there is a constant fitness of the file to the persons and characters described; pleasure and inftruction here always go hand in hand; vice and virtue are set in constant opposition, and religion every where inculcated in it's native beauty, and cheerful amiableness; not drefled up in stiff, melancholy, or gloomy forms, on one hand; nor yet, on the other, debased below it's due dignity, and noble requisites, in compliment to a too fashionable, but depraved taste. And this I will boldly say, that if it's numerous beauties are added to it's excellent tendency, it will be found worthy a place, not only in all families, (especially such as have in them young persons of either sex) but in the colleaions of the most curious and polite i cauers. For as it borrows none of it's excelencies from the romantick fights of unnatural fancy, it's being founded in truth and nature, and built upon experience, wil be a laiting recommendation to the discerning and judicious; while the agrecable variety of occurrences and characiers, in which it abounds, will not fail to engage the attention of the gay and more {prightly readers.

The moral refle&ions and uses to be drawn from the several parts of this admirable history, are 10 happily deduced from a crowd of different events and characters, in the conclution of the work, that I shall. fay de less on that head. But, I think, the hints you have given me, fhould also prefatorily be given to the publick; viz. That it will ap

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