The pilgrim's progress. With notes by W. Mason, and a life of the author, by J. Conder

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Page 30 - See that ye refuse not him that speaketh : for if they escaped not who refused him that spake on earth, much more shall not we escape, if we turn away from him that speaketh from heaven...
Page 220 - Here they heard, voices from out of the City, loud voices, saying, " Say ye to the daughter of Zion, Behold, thy salvation cometh ! Behold, his reward is with him !'* Here all the inhabitants o'f the country called them, " the holy people, the redeemed of the Lord, sought out,
Page 346 - He that is down needs fear no fall ; He that is low no pride ; He that is humble ever shall Have God to be his Guide.
Page 163 - You have this night trespassed on me, by trampling in and lying on my grounds, and therefore you must go along with me. So they were forced to go, because he was stronger than they. They also had but little to say, for they knew themselves in a fault. The Giant, therefore, drove them before him, and put them into his castle, into a very dark dungeon, nasty and stinking to the spirits of these two men.
Page 168 - The Lord that delivered me out of the paw of the lion, and out of the paw of the bear, he will deliver me out of the hand of this Philistine.
Page 163 - Now there was, not far from the place where they lay, a castle, called Doubting Castle, the owner whereof was Giant Despair; and it was in his grounds they now were sleeping : wherefore, he getting up in the morning early, and walking up and down in his fields, caught Christian and Hopeful asleep in his grounds. Then, with a grim and surly voice, he bid them awake, and asked them whence they were, and what they did in his grounds? They told him they were Pilgrims, and that they had lost their way....
Page 12 - I dreamed, and behold, I saw a man clothed with rags, standing in a certain place, with his face from his own house, a book in his hand, and a great burden upon his back. I looked, and saw him open the book, and read therein; and, as he read, he wept, and trembled; and, not being able longer to contain, he brake out with a lamentable cry, saying, What shall I do?
Page 379 - There is that scattereth, and yet increaseth; and there is that withholdeth more than is meet, but it tendeth to poverty.
Page 187 - The sword of him that layeth at him cannot hold : the spear, the dart, nor the habergeon ; he esteemeth iron as straw, and brass as rotten wood ; the arrow cannot make him fly ; slingstones are turned with him into stubble; darts are counted as stubble; he laugheth at the shaking of a spear
Page 165 - ... said he, should you choose life, seeing it is attended with so much bitterness? But they desired him to let them go; with that he looked ugly upon them, and rushing to them, had doubtless made an end of them himself, but that he fell into one of his fits (for he sometimes in sunshiny weather fell into fits), and lost for a time the use of his hands.

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